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Dolphin washes up dead in Brazil after G-string wrapped around its flipper causing severe injuries 

Dolphin is killed by woman’s LINGERIE: Animal washes up dead in Brazil after G-string wrapped around its flipper and caused severe injuries

  • The body of a young, female dolphin washed up on a Brazilian beach in Itapoa municipality this month 
  • The animal had a G-string wrapped around one of its flipper, cutting through the skin almost to the bone
  • Veterinarians believe the underwear might have hampered the dolphin’s swimming and fishing ability
  • The Guiana dolphin showed signs of chronic weakness such as thinness and pneumonia, and had parasites
  • Gill net marks around the animal’s  face and breathing hole were also visible in autopsy photographs
  • Fabrics discarded in the sea threaten marine animals, with synthetics taking hundreds of years to degrade

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A dolphin has been killed by a piece of lingerie after the animal washed up on a Brazilian beach with a G-string wrapped around its flipper.

The undergarment had become so tightly wound that it had cut the dolphin’s flipper almost to the bone.

An environmental monitoring team removed the Guiana dolphin’s carcass from the beach in the municipality of Itapoa on May 16. 

The veterinary team that autopsied the animal believes the underwear had been attached to the dolphin for some time and may have contributed to its death.

They suggested that the dolphin had gotten its flipper tangled in the fabric when it was younger, compromising its ability to swim and fish. 

A dolphin has been killed by a piece of lingerie after the animal washed up on a Brazilian beach with a G-string wrapped around its flipper

Fabrics discarded in the sea pose a threat to marine species. While natural fabrics such as cotton, linen and silk take months to decompose, synthetic fabrics such as polyester can take hundreds of years

Fabrics discarded in the sea pose a threat to marine species. While natural fabrics such as cotton, linen and silk take months to decompose, synthetic fabrics such as polyester can take hundreds of years

Veterinarian Giulia Gaglianone said the dolphin's skin had healed around the G-string, leaving the animal with a permanently open wound through which the material looped

Veterinarian Giulia Gaglianone said the dolphin’s skin had healed around the G-string, leaving the animal with a permanently open wound through which the material looped

Veterinarian Giulia Gaglianone said the dolphin’s skin had healed around the G-string, leaving the animal with a permanently open wound through which the material looped.

The dolphin also showed signs of chronic weakness such as thinness, pneumonia and a large number of parasites in part of its ear and in the lungs. 

It also had gill net marks around its face and breathing hole. 

The dolphin was a young female, measuring around 1.4 metres (4.6 feet) and weighting 32.2kg (5.1 stone).

The Guiana dolphin (Sotalia guianensis) is found in the waters to the north and east of South America and in the waters to the east of Central America.

It is a near threatened species, mainly due to entanglement in nets.

Fabrics discarded in the sea pose a threat to marine species. 

While natural fabrics such as cotton, linen and silk take months to decompose,  synthetic fabrics such as polyester can take hundreds of years. 

The dolphin was a young female, measuring around 1.4 metres (4.6 feet) and weighting 32.2kg (5.1 stone)

The dolphin was a young female, measuring around 1.4 metres (4.6 feet) and weighting 32.2kg (5.1 stone)

The dolphin also showed signs of chronic weakness such as thinness, pneumonia and a large number of parasites in part of its ear and in the lungs. It also had gill net marks around its face and breathing hole

The dolphin also showed signs of chronic weakness such as thinness, pneumonia and a large number of parasites in part of its ear and in the lungs. It also had gill net marks around its face and breathing hole

The Guiana dolphin (Sotalia guianensis) is found in the waters to the north and east of South America and in the waters to the east of Central America. Pictured: The dolphin's damaged breathing hole

The Guiana dolphin (Sotalia guianensis) is found in the waters to the north and east of South America and in the waters to the east of Central America. Pictured: The dolphin’s damaged breathing hole 

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