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Donald Trump’s approval rating at 33% low as 53% want him to resign

Donald Trump’s approval rating hits all-time low of 33% and 53% of people in the same poll say they want him to resign for the MAGA riot incitement

  • President Donald Trump’s approval rating sits at 33 per cent after Wednesday’s Capitol Hill riot, trying with the lowest of his presidency
  • A Quinnipiac poll found that 53 per cent of voters believe the president should resign for inciting the MAGA riot, while 52 per cent say he should be removed  
  • The attackers on Capitol Hill were motivated by Trump’s false claims that the election had been stolen from him 
  • The polling found 73 per cent of Republicans believe Trump’s claims that there was widespread voter fraud, something just 5 per cent of Democrats believed 
  • Quinnipiac found that 56 per cent of voters hold Trump responsible for the MAGA mob, while 42 per cent do not 

President Donald Trump‘s approval rating sits at 33 per cent after Wednesday’s Capitol Hill riot – tying with the lowest of his presidency. 

A new Quinnipiac poll, conducted after the attack, found that 53 per cent of voters believe the president should resign for inciting the MAGA riot. 

A slightly lower number, 52 per cent, said he should be removed from office.  

A majority of voters told Quinnipiac that they believed President Donald Trump was responsbile for Wednesday’s violence on Capitol Hill. Fifty-three per cent said Trump should resign from office, with just nine days left, 52 per cent said he should be removed

President Donald Trump's supporters are trying to push through the police line on Capitol Hill Wednesday. Afterward, Americans rewarded Trump with a 33 per cent approval rating, tying with the lowest marks he's had in his four year presidency

President Donald Trump’s supporters are trying to push through the police line on Capitol Hill Wednesday. Afterward, Americans rewarded Trump with a 33 per cent approval rating, tying with the lowest marks he’s had in his four year presidency 

There's a large gulf between parties when the question was asked if voters believed widespread fraud occurred. Seventy-three per cent of Republicans said they believed it did, parroting Trump, while just 5 per cent of Democrats agreed

There’s a large gulf between parties when the question was asked if voters believed widespread fraud occurred. Seventy-three per cent of Republicans said they believed it did, parroting Trump, while just 5 per cent of Democrats agreed 

Trump has just nine days left in his term.  

A majority of voters hold Trump responsible for Wednesday’s violent incident, which killed five people including a U.S. Capitol Police officer. Another Capitol Police officer committed suicide. 

Quinnipiac found that 56 per cent of voters hold Trump responsible, while 42 per cent do not.  

Americans are split on whether they define Wednesday’s attack on the capitol as a coup attempt. 

Supporters of Trump mobbed the capitol as Congress was meeting to certify President-elect Joe Biden’s Electoral College win. 

Trump egged on the crowd in remarks at the ellipse earlier Wednesday. 

Forty-seven per cent of voters said they believed what happened was a coup attempt, while 43 per cent did not. 

Ten per cent of survey respondents said they weren’t sure whether it was a coup. 

Both Democrats and Republicans wanted to see those involved punished. 

Ninety-one  per cent of voters surveyed said the individuals involved should be held accountable for their actions. Just 6 per cent disagreed. 

‘Pick them up and lock them up. There’s no ambivalence on how to treat the mobs that breached the Capitol, and there is nearly the same level of alarm from Republicans and Democrats over extremism establishing a troubling foothold,’ explained Quinnipiac University Polling Analyst Tim Malloy.

Eighty-one per cent of voters said that extremism is a big problem in the United States, with just 12 per cent saying it wasn’t. 

The attackers on Capitol Hill were motivated by Trump’s false claims that the election had been stolen from him. 

There is no evidence of widespread voter fraud. 

But Quinnipiac’s polling showed the wide gulf between Democrats and Republicans believing this fact. 

Overall, more than half of voters – 58 per cent – said they believed there was no widespread voter fraud in the 2020 presidential election. Another 37 per cent of voters said they did. 

However, among Republicans 73 per cent said they believed there was widespread voter fraud, with just 21 per cent saying there wasn’t. 

Among Democrats 93 per cent said there was no widespread voter fraud, with just 5 per cent of Democrats saying there was. 

Independents fell more in line with Democrats, with 60 per cent saying there was not widespread voter fraud and 36 per cent saying there was.   

The last time Trump’s approval rating hit 33 per cent was in August 2017.

At the time, Trump had just lost his White House Communication Director Anthony Scaramucci, in a brief but dramatic stint. 

Additionally, lawmakers on Capitol Hill ended the Trump-backed effort to kill Obamacare.  

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