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Employees at Trump’s residential tower in Chicago vaccinated early after hospital COO resident

An investigation has been launched after it emerged the Chief Operating Officer of a Chicago hospital was able to get the vaccine for 72 employees at the building where he lived, almost three weeks before they were officially eligible for the jab.

Dr. Anosh Ahmed, the COO of Loretto Hospital, located in the city’s Oak Park neighborhood purchased a condominium on the 43rd floor of the Trump building in downtown Chicago in October last year for $2.7 million. 

Ahmed, 37, is said to have told acquaintances that he vaccinated Donald Trump‘s son, Eric, an executive at the Trump Organization and sent a picture around of himself posing with Eric Trump

Soon after the meeting, 72 workers at the building where Ahmed resides  were all treated to the jab weeks ahead of others in more vulnerable categories. 

Eric Trump stands with Anosh Ahmed, the chief operating officer of Loretto Hospital. Screenshots and video show Ahmed sent this photo to people along with a message saying he vaccinated Trump but then later claimed that he was joking 

Dr. Ahmed, 37, the COO of Loretto Hospital in west Chicago owns an apartment in Trump Tower in downtown Chicago

Dr. Ahmed, 37, the COO of Loretto Hospital in west Chicago owns an apartment in Trump Tower in downtown Chicago

An arrangement appears to have been made after Doctor Ahmed claimed to have vaccinated Donald Trump's son, Eric, to have 72 workers from the Trump Chicago building vaccinated

An arrangement appears to have been made after Doctor Ahmed claimed to have vaccinated Donald Trump’s son, Eric, to have 72 workers from the Trump Chicago building vaccinated

Dr. Ahmed, 37, purchased a condominium on the 43rd floor of the Trump building in October last year for $2.7 million

Dr. Ahmed, 37, purchased a condominium on the 43rd floor of the Trump building in October last year for $2.7 million

Eric Trump is an executive vice president and trustee of the Trump Organization, which owns the Trump Tower hotel and residence, but the millionaire would not have been eligible to be vaccinated in Chicago.

The workers from the Trump Tower in Chicago had its workers receive the jab on March 10th despite city guidelines saying the employees of hotels and residential buildings would not be eligible until March 29th.

At the time, Chicago vaccination centers were limiting the vaccine to vulnerable populations, including people over 65, prisoners, teachers and first responders, not hotel workers or those in hospitality.

The action for the 72 injections was approved by the hospital’s chief executive, George Miller who justified the injections by noting that the employees were ‘predominantly black and brown,’ and the event had been requested by Trump employees who live on Chicago’s West Side, near the hospital according to Block Club Chicago.

The small 122-bed hospital is nine miles from the luxury tower block in downtown Chicago and situated in a mainly black neighborhood where people have been hit hard by coronavirus and few have been vaccinated.

Dr. Anosh Ahmed is the COO of Loretto Hospital, located in the city's Oak Park neighborhood

Dr. Anosh Ahmed is the COO of Loretto Hospital, located in the city’s Oak Park neighborhood

The small 122-bed Loretto hospital is located in a mainly black neighborhood where people have been hit hard by coronavirus and few have been vaccinated

The small 122-bed Loretto hospital is located in a mainly black neighborhood where people have been hit hard by coronavirus and few have been vaccinated

'We were, at the time, under the impression that restaurant and other front line hospitality industry workers were considered 'essential' under the City of Chicago's 1B eligibility requirements,' Loretto Hospital's CEO George Miller, pictured, said in a statement

‘We were, at the time, under the impression that restaurant and other front line hospitality industry workers were considered ‘essential’ under the City of Chicago’s 1B eligibility requirements,’ Loretto Hospital’s CEO George Miller, pictured, said in a statement

The hospital has said it ‘mistakenly vaccinated’ the workers and that their mission is to provide vaccines to the ‘minority communities hardest hit’ by the pandemic. 

‘We were, at the time, under the impression that restaurant and other front line hospitality industry workers were considered ‘essential’ under the City of Chicago’s 1B eligibility requirements,’ Miller said in a statement. 

‘I now understand, after subsequent conversations with the Chicago Department of Public Health, that we were mistaken.’  

The Democrat Mayor of Chicago Lori Lightfoot said she was ‘disappointed’ at the news. 

‘We have a finite amount of vaccine in the city. We’ve been really, really careful to make sure that we’re using it in a way that prioritizes the most vulnerable people who are most at risk and most at risk of spreading it,’ Lightfoot said on Wednesday. 

‘We cannot have something like this happen again.’ 

The Democrat Mayor of Chicago Lori Lightfoot said she was ‘disappointed’ at the news

‘They know it was a mistake. I’ve asked Dr. Arwady to dig deeper to make sure that … to trust but verify. To make sure that what they told us, the COO who decided to host this event, that it was limited to hotel workers and not some other circumstances.

‘But they recognize that this was a mistake and absolutely can never be repeated. It’s a cautionary tale for any other provider.’  

Dr. Ahmed has also since said that his claim of him vaccinating Eric Trump was in fact a ‘joke’. 

‘Eric Trump happened to be in the building but we did not vaccinate him,’ Ahmed said in a statement. ‘A few residents including myself did take a photo with him. My post was meant as a joke…’, he wrote. His personal Facebook page remains offline. 

There is high demand for the vaccine in Chicago with just one in six Chicagoans having received their first dose as of Wednesday – just over 10 per cent of the city’s 2.7m population.

There is high demand for the vaccine in Chicago with just one in six Chicagoans having received their first dose as of Wednesday - just over 10 per cent of the city's 2.7m population

There is high demand for the vaccine in Chicago with just one in six Chicagoans having received their first dose as of Wednesday – just over 10 per cent of the city’s 2.7m population

Statement from Loretto Hospital 

On March 10 and 11, 2021, The Loretto Hospital infectious disease team vaccinated 72 predominately black and brown restaurant, housekeeping, and other hotel support personnel at Trump International Chicago. 

Stemming from requests from West side residents who work at the hotel and were unable to leave their jobs to be vaccinated during regular in-hospital hours, this effort was one of multiple off-site community vaccination initiatives undertaken by The Loretto Hospital in accordance with its mission of ensuring vaccine accessibility to the minority communities hardest hit by the COVID-19 pandemic. 

The vaccine doses used were from The Loretto Hospital’s vaccine allotment, not from Protect Chicago Plus allocations, which are reserved specifically for Austin residents. 

The Chicago Department of Public Health has been in contact with hospital leadership to clarify the department’s guidance regarding community vaccinations moving forward.   

Loretto Hospital CEO’s letter to staff

Loretto Hospital CEO, George Miller, wrote a letter to hospital staff to explain the fiasco

Loretto Hospital CEO, George Miller, wrote a letter to hospital staff to explain the fiasco

On March 10, I authorized The Loretto Hospital infectious disease team to vaccinate 72 predominately Black and brown restaurant, housekeeping, and other hotel support personnel at Trump International Chicago. 

Similar to other community vaccination efforts we have undertaken, this stemmed from requests from West side residents who work at the hotel and were unable to leave their jobs to be vaccinated during regular in-hospital hours. 

We were, at the time, under the impression that restaurant and other frontline hospitality industry workers were considered ‘essential’ under the City of Chicago’s 1B eligibility requirements. 

I now understand, after subsequent conversations with the Chicago Department of Public Health, that we were mistaken.

The vaccination doses used at the hotel were from our Loretto vaccine allotment. 

They were not part of Protect Chicago Plus allocations, which are designated for and being administered exclusively to Austin residents. 

Our mission remains focused on ensuring vaccine accessibility to the minority communities hardest hit by the COVID-19 pandemic. 

We have met the community where they are, responding to requests to vaccinate 1B-eligible brothers and sisters at Malcolm X College, subsidized senior housing facilities operated by Habilitative Systems, Inc., Featherfist Women’s Shelter, By The Hand Club For Kids, Moving Everest charter school, CPD’s 15th Precinct, and several community churches. 

I am proud to work alongside a team that has so tirelessly and selflessly devoted itself to this mission.

George Miller CEO  


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