US

Eric Trump made bet on Air Force One that his dad would get 320 Electoral College votes

Eric Trump was so confident of his father’s victory that he made a bet on Air Force One on eve of election that he would get 320 Electoral College votes

  • Eric Trump was so confident in his father’s victory that he made a bet President Donald Trump would win 320 Electoral College votes
  • The New York Times reported Sunday that while flying home on Air Force One from the president’s final campaign rally Eric proposed a betting pool 
  • The now ex-president’s middle son said his father would win at least 320, while an adviser aware of the polling said he hoped they’d get to the winning 270
  • Trump got 232 Electoral College votes, nearly 100 short of what Eric Trump predicted, while President Joe Biden won with 306 
  • Trump would have needed to retain Pennsylvania, Michigan, Wisconsin, Arizona and Georgia and win Nevada and Minnesota too, to get more than 320 
  • The Times reporting suggests Trump and his allies truly believed polling was fake, as no national poll ever showed Trump beating Biden in the election 

Eric Trump was so confident in his father’s victory that he made a bet President Donald Trump would win 320 Electoral College votes. 

The New York Times reported Sunday that while flying home on Air Force One from the Trump’s last pre-election day rally, in Grand Rapids, Michigan, Eric proposed an Electoral College betting pool. 

The then-president’s middle son wagered that his dad would win at least 320 electoral votes, with 270 needed to win the White House for another four years. 

Eric Trump (left) made a bet on board Air Force One after President Donald Trump’s final pre-Election Day rally in Grand Rapids, Michigan (pictured) saying he believed his father would win the election with at least 320 Electoral College votes 

Now former President Donald Trump is photographed at his Fayetteville, North Carolina rally on November 2, his last day of campaigning before Election Day. According to The New York Times, Trump and his allies believed he would win because of the large size of his rallies

Now former President Donald Trump is photographed at his Fayetteville, North Carolina rally on November 2, his last day of campaigning before Election Day. According to The New York Times, Trump and his allies believed he would win because of the large size of his rallies 

Former President Donald Trump is pictured on November 2 arriving in Pennsylvania for a final rally. New reporting from The Times suggests that Trump and his inner circle truly believed that polling - which for months showed President Joe Biden would win - was fake

Former President Donald Trump is pictured on November 2 arriving in Pennsylvania for a final rally. New reporting from The Times suggests that Trump and his inner circle truly believed that polling – which for months showed President Joe Biden would win – was fake 

Another adviser, more attuned to the polling data, said, ‘We’re just trying to get to 270,’ The Times said. 

Trump lost the election to President Joe Biden earning only 232 Electoral College votes – nearly 100 short of what Eric Trump said.  

Biden won 306.  

For Trump to get to 320 he would have had to retain Georgia, Arizona, Pennsylvania, Michigan and Wisconsin – states that Biden flipped.  

He would have needed to flip Nevada, a state Hillary Clinton won in 2016 but was close. 

And also flip Minnesota, a state the Trump team thought was in reach.  

The anecdote was part of a larger deep-dive the paper did about the former president’s push to discredit Biden’s win, which led to the January 6 insurrection attempt by Trump supporters on Capitol Hill. 

Most pre-Election Day polling found that the president was likely to appear ahead on November 3, but then could be overtaken once the more Democratic-friendly mail-in ballots were added in.  

However, according to The Times, most members of Trump’s inner circle believed that the president’s early lead would be insurmountable. 

They pointed to the unscientific measure of Trump’s rally crowds.    

Trump and his allies often snickered at the events Biden held, which were kept small and socially distant due to the coronavirus pandemic.   

The president, who restarted holding rallies in June despite the continued spread of COVID-19, attracted packed, mostly mask-less crowds in a number of key swing states.  

But national polling, going back as far as September 2019, never showed Trump beating Biden in the general election. 

The polls ended up being accurate – with Arizona the first red state to fall on election night.   

The Times did not report whether Eric Trump paid anyone over his bet. 

A spokesperson for Eric Trump did not respond to a request for comment from DailyMail.com. 

Advertisement


Source link

Related Articles

Back to top button