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Expert debunks the NINE most common beauty and skincare myths

A beauty expert has debunked nine of the most common beauty and skincare myths around, including the idea that expensive products work better than cheap ones and wearing makeup every day is bad for your skin.

Dr Deborah Lee, from RY and Doctor Fox, said many of us think we are doing bad things to our skin when in actual fact our habits aren’t half as harmful as we think.

Some of the most surprising myths include the idea that chocolate causes acne and a lack of sleep causes under-eye circles.

A beauty expert has debunked nine of the most common beauty and skincare myths around, including the idea that expensive products work better than cheap ones (stock image)

1. It’s better to use expensive products

Many think price means quality when it comes to skincare.

But Dr Deborah Lee said there ‘is a lot of psychology involved in purchasing skincare products’, and it doesn’t always equate.

‘Always read the product label to find out what ingredients are in the product,’ she told FEMAIL.

‘You should also buy the right skincare products for your type and fully do your research before buying anything.’ 

Acne is a common problem for teenagers across the world, but Dr Lee said it's not unique to this age group - and it can strike at any age and stage (stock image)

Acne is a common problem for teenagers across the world, but Dr Lee said it’s not unique to this age group – and it can strike at any age and stage (stock image)

2. You can outgrow acne

Acne is a common problem for teenagers across the world, but Dr Lee said it’s not unique to this age group – and it can strike at any age and stage.

‘Although teenage acne is all too common – 80 per cent of teenagers complain of it – and does tend to improve with age, many women find this does not happen and they continue to struggle with breakouts into their adult life,’ Dr Lee said.

By definition, adult acne is acne for anyone over the age of 25, and research shows that it’s more persistent in women than men and can go on past the age of 50.

3. Oily skin doesn’t need moisturiser

You might think your oily complexion shouldn’t have any more moisture added to it in the form of moisturiser.

But this simply isn’t true, Dr Lee explained.

‘Oily skin means the skin is producing too much natural oil – sebum. This is not the same as the degree of hydration of the skin –  which is the amount of water retention in the skin,’ she said.

In fact, avoiding moisturiser could make your skin even more oily.

Just make sure you pick the right moisturiser and try to find one that won’t block your pores.

Dr Lee said there is absolutely no evidence daily use is bad for your skin, as long as you follow some simple rules (stock image)

Dr Lee said there is absolutely no evidence daily use is bad for your skin, as long as you follow some simple rules (stock image)

4. Wearing makeup every day is bad for your skin

Lots of women think regular makeup usage is going to clog up their skin and pores and lead to breakouts.

But Dr Lee said there is absolutely no evidence daily use is bad for your skin, as long as you follow some simple rules:

‘Always remove your makeup every night – do not go to bed with your makeup on as this results in clogged pores,’ she said.

While you can use makeup wipes, the skin expert also said you should try washing your face with ‘good old fashioned soap and water’. 

Dr Lee said you absolutely must make sure you get off every scrap, even up to the hairline, and then also wear SPF every day, before you apply your makeup.

‘I also recommend cleaning your makeup brushes once a month, as sweat and dead skin cells make them a breeding ground for bacteria,’ Dr Lee said.

‘Finally, don’t share your makeup. And go for well-known brands you can trust, with simple ingredients. Always read your product labels.’

5. You don’t need SPF if it’s in your foundation

Even if you have SPF in your makeup products, dermatologist Dr Leslie Baumann said you still need sun cream underneath.

She explained you would need seven times the normal amount of foundation and fourteen times as much powder to get adequate skin protection from the sun, and that’s just not practical. 

Both her and Dr Lee say you should apply some SPF alongside your moisturiser and foundation for maximum benefits. 

Give it a few moments to soak in before applying your makeup.

6. A lack of sleep causes under-eye circles

Under-eye circles have nothing to do with how much sleep you’ve had, medical research suggests.

In fact, they are more hereditary and all is due to how thin and delicate the skin under your eyes is. 

‘Under-eye circles tend to worsen with age due to skin sagging and loss of subcutaneous fat,’ Dr Lee said. 

You can try to help things by drinking plenty of water and regularly applying moisturiser and eye cream.

7. You need to start wearing eye cream by a certain age

Eye cream is one of those things many facialists will say you need in your skincare regime by the time you hit 25, but in actual fact, Dr Lee said regular face creams will do almost as good a job. 

‘If you want to use eye cream, there is no magic age to start it,’ Dr Lee said.

‘Eye creams that contain retinol and speed up cell turnover could be used from the age of 25. Retinol also stimulates the production of elastin and can help prevent the development of fine lines and wrinkles.’

You could also look for eye creams with vitamin C – which is a potent antioxidant that can be used from the age of 18 – and hyaluronic acid – which helps to plump out the skin. 

9. You can find skincare products that work as well as cosmetic procedures 

You can spend all the money you want on skincare, but Dr Lee said nothing will work as well as laser treatment, injections and fillers.

‘These procedures can make you look significantly younger by filling out the skin, smoothing wrinkles and reversing skin sagging – all the hallmarks of ageing,’ she said. 

While a good skincare regime is key, nothing will have the same effect as Botox or facial procedures.

Finally, Dr Lee explained that there is very little research around the idea that eating chocolate makes you break out (stock image)

Finally, Dr Lee explained that there is very little research around the idea that eating chocolate makes you break out (stock image)

9. Eating chocolate makes you break out

Finally, Dr Lee explained that there is very little research around the idea that eating chocolate makes you break out.

‘Your diet may still have a bearing on your acne,’ she said.

‘Acne is less common in people who don’t eat a Western diet. This is a diet that contains many high glycaemic foods – which are high carbohydrate foods that release energy quickly like bread, biscuits and cakes.’

However, some chocolate in moderation is fine and won’t cause breakouts.

Ideally, choose the 70 or 80 per cent dark variety. 


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