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Glenn Youngkin’s underage son, 17, tried to vote TWICE in the Virginia gubernatorial election

Virginia Governor-elect Glenn Youngkin’s son twice tried to vote in the election his father later won – despite being underage, officials say.

Thomas Youngkin, 17, turned up at Great Falls Library in Virginia on two occasions to attempt to vote in the November 2 election his Republican father later won.

Notes written by observer Jennifer Chanty, and seen by WUSA reporter Mike Valerio for the day say: ‘9:30am, 17 yo voter came in requested ballot. Told he had to 18 today to vote. Offered voter registration. He declined.’

Then in the next entry, for 10am, the observer wrote: ‘Same 17 yo voter – named Thomas Youngkin – came back to request a ballot. Again offered opportunity to register – he declined if he would not be able to vote today.’

Thomas Youngkin (right), pictured on stage next to his siblings at a victory rally on November 3, tried to vote for his father twice in Virginia’s gubernatorial election

Thomas, pictured behind his mom Suzanne on at a victory rally on November 3, did not vote or break any state election laws, according to election officials

Thomas, pictured behind his mom Suzanne on at a victory rally on November 3, did not vote or break any state election laws, according to election officials

Thomas is pictured with his dad during counting during this week's gubernatorial race, which Glenn Youngkin won

Thomas is pictured with his dad during counting during this week’s gubernatorial race, which Glenn Youngkin won 

This document released by Fairfax County officials notes that a teenage boy, later confirmed to be Thomas, attempted to vote at the Hickory precinct twice on Tuesday morning

This document released by Fairfax County officials notes that a teenage boy, later confirmed to be Thomas, attempted to vote at the Hickory precinct twice on Tuesday morning 

Thomas’s name was redacted in a tweet shared by a WUSA reporter, but has since been confirmed by multiple media outlets.   

Fairfax County official released a statement Friday identifying Youngkin’s son and confirming that he did not vote or violate any state election laws, because he didn’t attempt to conceal his real age and vote fraudulently. No charges will be filed. 

A spokesman for Youngkin confirmed events, saying Thomas had ‘misunderstood’ the rules – but made no attempt to say why he’d tried to vote twice.  

Thomas, a high school junior, presented his driver’s license at the Great Falls Library when Jennifer Chanty, the precinct captain, told him he was too young.

Chanty said she offered to register the boy to vote in upcoming elections but he declined and left the building. 

She recounted that the teen returned about 30 minutes later insisting that his friend who is also 17-years-old was able to vote and therefore he should be able to cast his ballot. 

According to Virginia’s election laws, a 17-year-old can can cast their ballot in a primary election if they’ll be 18-years-old at the time of the general election. 

‘I told him, ‘I don’t know what occurred with your friend, but you are not registered to vote today. You’re welcome to register, but you will not be voting today,’ ‘ Chanty said.  

Chanty noted that the Youngkins are not registered to vote at the Hickory precinct. ‘It was just weird,’ she said. ‘He was very insistent that he wanted to vote in this election and I said, ‘Well, you’re not old enough.” 

While she thought the teen’s actions were odd she does not believe he had bad intentions. 

‘Teenagers do stupid things,’ Chanty said. ‘I’ll chalk it up to that. I’ll believe that first before anything else.’

Fairfax County released the Observation, Comments, and Suggestions notes from the Hickory Precinct on November 2. The first two lines note a 17-year-old boy who attempted to cast a vote at 9:30 am and again at 10 am. 

Scott O. Konopasek, the head of Fairfax’s elections office, confirmed that according to Chanty’s account, the boy, later identified as Thomas, did not break any state election laws.  

Konopasek said the teen ‘did not vote,’ ‘made no false statements,’ and ‘did not disrupt voting’ therefore ‘he committed no election offense as defined in Chapter 10 of the Elections Code.’ 

Youngkin, a Republican former private equity executive, defeated former Governor Terry McAuliffe on Tuesday after running a campaign in which he made ‘election integrity’ one of his issues. 

Glenn Youngkin, pictured, went on to win the governorship, and his son won't face any charges because he was honest about his age, and did not try to attempt to vote using fraudulent information.

Glenn Youngkin, pictured, went on to win the governorship, and his son won’t face any charges because he was honest about his age, and did not try to attempt to vote using fraudulent information. 

His victory came after a late surge in polls credited to parents concerns about progressive teachings in Virginia’s schools, on issues such as race and gender.  

While Youngkin kept former Republican President Donald Trump at a distance in an attempt to win over moderates offended by Trump’s style, his promotion of ‘election integrity’ was coded language to appeal to voters who erroneously believe the 2020 election was stolen from Trump.  

Devin O’Malley, a spokesman for Youngkin, released a statement about the incident involving Youngkin’s son on Friday. 

‘It’s unfortunate that while Glenn attempts to unite the Commonwealth around his positive message of better schools, safer streets, a lower cost of living, and more jobs, his political opponents — mad that they suffered historic losses this year — are pitching opposition research on a 17-year old kid who honestly misunderstood Virginia election law and simply asked polling officials if he was eligible to vote; when informed he was not, he went to school,’ the statement read.  

This comes as Republicans have continued to push baseless claims of election fraud since Trump’s loss in 2020. 

Trump even began spewing speculation ahead of Virginia’s high-profile gubernatorial election before Youngkin was elected. He said in a statement that he was ‘not a believer in the integrity of Virginia´s elections, lots of bad things went on, and are going on.’ 

Yet in his statement congratulating Youngkin on his win, Trump made no mention of the integrity of the election and credited his own supporters with the win.  




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