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Honduran mother discovers her four-year-old son who was found naked near US-Mexico border

‘That moment was like if I was getting my life back:’ Mother of four-year-old Honduran boy found naked near US-Mexico border finds out her son’s alive after seeing television clip

  • Four-year-old Nahún Elias George was not wearing any clothing when a family driving in Nuevo León, Mexico spotted him on the side of a road September 10
  • The Honduras native became separated from his father September 9 when a smuggler abandoned a truck with 100 migrants on a road in General Bravo
  • Alma Cabrera learned Mexican authorities were trying to determine who the child’s parents were while she was watching a Univision news cast September 11
  • She allowed her husband to take her son to the U.S. because she had heard immigration officials permitted kids under five to cross the border with parents
  • Cabrera said her husband, Nahún George, is stuck in Reynosa, Mexico but that the whereabouts of her sister, Norma Cabrera, are unknown


A mother in Honduras cried tears of joy after stumbling across a TV clip that captured her four-year-old son safe and sound after he was found naked on a road about 60 miles from Mexico‘s border with the United States. 

Alma Cabrera was watching a Univision news segment on September 11 when she discovered that Mexican authorities were looking for the parents of Nahún Elias George, who had been spotted on a field by a family driving through General Bravo, León, and turned over to the local police a day earlier.

‘It was a moment of happiness for me,’ Cabrera told the network. ‘That moment was like if I was getting my life back.’

Four-year-old Honduras native Nahún Elias George was found naked and walking on a road by himself on September 10 in General Bravo, a city in northern Mexico that is located 50 miles from the United States border. The boy was with his father and son when they truck they were traveling on was abandoned by a migrant smuggling driver in the same city on September 9. The child somehow separated from his family and spent the day walking along before a family spotted him on the side of a road and turned him over to local authorities

Alma Cabrera told Univision that she gave her husband permission to migrate to the United States with their four-year-old son because she heard immigration agents were allowing children under the age of five to cross into the U.S. as long as they were accompanied by a parent

Alma Cabrera told Univision that she gave her husband permission to migrate to the United States with their four-year-old son because she heard immigration agents were allowing children under the age of five to cross into the U.S. as long as they were accompanied by a parent

Some of the 103 migrants who were rescued from a locked cargo truck in General Bravo, a city in the northeast Mexico state of Nuevo León. The town is about 58 miles from the U.S. border

Some of the 103 migrants who were rescued from a locked cargo truck in General Bravo, a city in the northeast Mexico state of Nuevo León. The town is about 58 miles from the U.S. border

Cabrera said she agreed to allow her son to migrate to the United States with her spouse Nahún George, and her sister, Norma Cabrera, because she had heard that the U.S. Border Patrol was allowing children under the age of five to cross from Mexico to the U.S. as long as they were accompanied by a parent.

Her husband contracted the services of a smuggler and left the northern Honduran town of Yoro on August 29 with his son and sister-in-law before they migrated into Mexico.

But the trio’s journey to the United States unraveled when the truck they were being ferried on was found by the National Institute of Migration and the National on a General Bravo road near Nuevo León’s border with the state of Tamaulipas on September 9 at 8:30am local time.

The driver left the trailer locked and took off running into the mountain area before agents heard the screams of 103 migrants from El Salvador, Honduras and Nicaragua and pulled them out to safety.

It’s unknown at what point Nahún Elías became separated from his father and aunt. Somehow the boy spent the next 24 hours walking through the city before he was discovered by the motorist.

National Institute of Migration and the National System for Integral Family Development officials were able to confirm he was traveling in the vehicle after showing him pictures of the cargo truck. 

Nahún Elías George, of Honduras, was found without clothes and walking along on the side of a road in Nuevo León, Mexico, on September 10, just a day after he became separated from his father and aunt when the truck they were traveling on was abandoned by a smuggler

Nahún Elías George, of Honduras, was found without clothes and walking along on the side of a road in Nuevo León, Mexico, on September 10, just a day after he became separated from his father and aunt when the truck they were traveling on was abandoned by a smuggler

Mexico's National Institute of Migration and the National Guard rescued 103 migrants from a locked cargo truck on September 9 in Nuevo León, Mexico.

Mexico’s National Institute of Migration and the National Guard rescued 103 migrants from a locked cargo truck on September 9 in Nuevo León, Mexico. 

Nahún Elías is currently staying at a shelter operated by the National System for Integral Family Development and his father remains stranded in the northern Mexico border town of Reynosa. 

However, Alma Cabrera is unaware of her sister’s whereabouts.

‘I am happy because of my child,’ Cabrera said as she fought back tears, ‘but there is hope, hope that she may be in (custody) of immigration (agents).’ 

Data released by the National Institute of Migration earlier this month showed that 34,427 minors had illegally entered Mexico between January 2021 and August 2021 – a 194 percent increase compared with the same period in 2020 when 11,703 underage children entered the country.

At least 8,525 unaccompanied children transited through Mexico during the first eight months of 2021. 

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