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‘How many chickens did you get, eh?’ Farmer picks up LYNX by scruff of neck and scolds it

‘How many chickens did you get, eh?’ Canadian farmer picks up a growling LYNX by the scruff of its neck and scolds it for killing his birds

  • Chris Paulson discovered lynx as it decimated his chickens in British Columbia 
  • He fearlessly grabbed the cat by the scruff of the neck to give him a talking to
  • ‘Let’s go see damage you did,’ Paulson told the cat as he showed him the coop
  • Despite the lynx shredding two chickens, Paulson released it back into the forest 

A Canadian farmer has filmed himself grabbing a lynx by the scruff of the neck to chide the animal for the trail of blood and feathers it left in his chicken coop.

Chris Paulson, from British Columbia, said he interrupted the wild cat in the middle of its killing spree and tried to scare him off.

‘I tried to scoot him out of there, but he was so focused on his prey. So I just reached down and picked him up like a house cat does with its kitten,’ Paulson told CBC.

He then carried the 24 pound lynx over to the coop where he had killed two of the farmer’s chickens.

‘Let’s go see the damage you did buddy,’ Paulson says to the lynx as he growls back moodily. ‘How many chickens did you get, eh, you got some of our new ones, not good is it.’

The lynx growls as the farmer carries it

Paulson picked up the lynx by the scruff of the neck after finding it going after his birds. ‘Let’s go see the damage you did buddy,’ Paulson says to the lynx as the cat growls moodily. ‘How many chickens did you get, eh, you got some of our new ones, not good is it.’

A dead chicken

The coop strewn with feathers after the lynx attack

A chicken carcass lies outside the front of the coop (left) and a trail of destruction inside (right)

The terrified chickens are heard clucking anxiously in the background as Paulson tells the cat: ‘See how upset you made everyone, that’s two – two of our new chickens.’

Despite the cat’s jaws just inches away from Paulson’s face, he says he wasn’t worried when he was holding the animal by its neck.

‘That’s how their mothers subdue them when they’re getting too rambunctious,’ he told CBC. ‘And they just go limp and submissive.’ 

While many farmers would have shot the lynx, Paulson said he put the cat in a dog kennel before transporting him away from his home in Decker Lake, west of Prince George, and releasing him back into the wild.

He even left the two chicken carcasses with the lynx, who the farmer’s two children named ‘Tuffnut,’ because he thought the cat looked very thin.

It’s not the first time Paulson’s chickens have been killed by predators.

Last month, a great grey owl killed two of the birds. 

Paulson videoed himself grabbing the lynx by the neck and carrying to to survey the aftermath

Paulson videoed himself grabbing the lynx by the neck and carrying to to survey the aftermath

Paulson videoed himself grabbing the lynx by the neck and carrying to to survey the aftermath 

Paulson, his wife and two children, live on indigenous Wet’suwet’en territory where his family have lived for nearly a century. 

‘We’re on a big cycle of nature here,’ he said. ‘There’s a lot of food out there, but there’s going to be a lot of predators as well.’ 

Jeff Palm, a local conservation officer, said he couldn’t condone Paulson’s grabbing of the lynx.

‘We don’t recommend handling a lynx with bare hands. You certainly might lose an arm,’ Palm told CBC News. ‘Lynx are wild cats and they can be ferocious.’

He added that it is technically illegal to capture wild animals and move them to a new location and could have resulted in a fine. 

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