US

Japanese political leader tied to a ‘Scientology-like’ cult will speak at CPAC

The Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) will host the leader of a ‘Scientology-like’ Japanese cult that claims to be able to cure coronavirus for $400 and whose founder has claimed that he is the reincarnation of an alien from Venus who created life on Earth.

The conference, an annual event hosted by the American Conservative Union, is scheduled to convene in Orlando for its three-day meeting beginning on Thursday.

One of its scheduled speakers is Hiroaki ‘Jay’ Aeba, a Japanese conservative who is scheduled to address the conference on Friday at the Hyatt Regency Orlando.

Aeba is scheduled to speak right after Donald Trump Jr.

Hiroaki ‘Jay’ Aeba is a Japanese conservative who is scheduled to address the CPAC conference on Friday at the Hyatt Regency Orlando. He is seen above at the 2019 CPAC event in National Harbor, Maryland

Aside from his political activities, Aeba is also a devotee of Happy Science, which is considered an extremist xenophobic cult that was founded by a former Wall Street trader, Ryuho Okawa, who claims to possess mystical powers

Aside from his political activities, Aeba is also a devotee of Happy Science, which is considered an extremist xenophobic cult that was founded by a former Wall Street trader, Ryuho Okawa, who claims to possess mystical powers

Happy Science followers are seen above in New York City's Times Square in March 2020 after the pandemic forced the state into lockdown. The group has claimed that it can provide 'spiritual vaccines' for $400 that would make people immune to COVID-19

Happy Science followers are seen above in New York City’s Times Square in March 2020 after the pandemic forced the state into lockdown. The group has claimed that it can provide ‘spiritual vaccines’ for $400 that would make people immune to COVID-19 

According to the CPAC website, Aeba heads the Japanese Conservative Union, which he founded in 2015 ‘as a counterpart to the American Conservative Union.’

Aeba is likely to speak about the threats posed by North Korea and China.

Aside from his political activities, Aeba is also a devotee of Happy Science, which is considered an extremist xenophobic cult that was founded by a former Wall Street trader who claims to possess mystical powers.

DailyMail.com has reached out to Aeba and CPAC for comment.

‘Happy Science is a Japanese cult run by a man who claims to be the incarnation of multiple Gods while pretending to channel the psychic spirits of anyone from Quetzalcoatl to Bashar al-Assad to Natalie Portman,’ researcher Sarah Hightower told VICE News.

It was founded in 1986 by Ryuho Okawa, a former stockbroker who is regarded by his followers as the incarnation of El Cantare, a supreme being from Venus who created life on Earth millions of years ago.

Okawa, who never speaks to the press, has claimed to channel the spirits of famous people who are both dead and alive, including Natalie Portman, Barack Obama, Steve Jobs, Isaac Newton, Albert Einstein, and Freddie Mercury.

Since its founding in 1986, Happy Science has amassed millions of followers worldwide. The image above shows a Happy Science monastery in Tokyo

Since its founding in 1986, Happy Science has amassed millions of followers worldwide. The image above shows a Happy Science monastery in Tokyo

Okawa has reportedly long sought to make Happy Science not just a spiritual-religious group but also a political movement. Aeba, who is a board member of Happy Science, is also the founder of its political wing, the Happiness Realization Party. Aeba is seen left with Kyoko Okawa, the wife of founder Ryuho Okawa, in May 2009

Okawa has reportedly long sought to make Happy Science not just a spiritual-religious group but also a political movement. Aeba, who is a board member of Happy Science, is also the founder of its political wing, the Happiness Realization Party. Aeba is seen left with Kyoko Okawa, the wife of founder Ryuho Okawa, in May 2009

He would also claim to be in contact with dead religious and spiritual leaders including Jesus, Buddha, Moses, and Confucius.

The movement claims millions of followers worldwide who flock to tens of thousands of missionary outposts.

Okawa, whose movement was officially recognized as a religion in Japan in 1991, has reportedly earned a fortune. Happy Science’s annual revenues are estimated to be around $45million.

In prior speeches, Okawa has said that he believes the Japanese are a chosen people destined to destroy the United States and make China ‘a slave.’

In his book Nostradamus: Fearful Prophecies, Okawa asserts that only the Japanese Leviathan will survive the imminent end of the world after destroying the United States and the now-defunct Soviet Union.

‘In the 21st Century, there will be no enemies for Leviathan. It will slash throats of the old eagle and the exhausted red bear, and laugh at the aging Europe. It will use China as a slave and Korea as a prostitute.’

Elsewhere in the book, he mocks American ‘civilization, which produced nothing more than weapons, cars, Coca-Cola and hamburgers. . . .’

Okawa’s ideas have been viewed as fascist or even reminiscent of Japan’s militarism of the 1930s, when the government portrayed its aggression in Asia as a ‘co-prosperity sphere’ imposed by a nation born to rule.

Freddie Mercury

Steve Jobs

Okawa, who never speaks to the press, has claimed to channel the spirits of famous people who are both dead and alive, including Natalie Portman, Barack Obama, Steve Jobs, Isaac Newton, Albert Einstein, and Freddie Mercury. Mercury is seen left in July 1985. Jobs is seen right in June 2011

Born in 1956, Okawa studied law at Tokyo University.

He gave up his hope of becoming a lawyer or a government official after failing his exams and joined a major trading firm, he said in The Laws of the Sun, one of his bestsellers.

The turning point came in 1981, when a spirit spoke to him.

‘My hand which held the pencil started to move as if it had its own life, and wrote, “Good news, good news.” . . . When I asked who it was, it signed, Nikko,’ a Buddhist saint.

In 1986, he started the group on the advice of many other spirits, including Jesus Christ and Japan’s sun goddess, Okawa said. 

‘I came here as more than the Messiah,’ he says in another book.

‘This universe, this world were based on my words and my teachings.’

Happy Science is reportedly secretive and hostile to the news media. Its religion is structured around a ‘pay-to-progress’ system of membership, similar to that of another controversial movement, Scientology.

After New York City went into lockdown last March due to the outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic, a group of Happy Science followers were seen in a desolate Times Square warning of a doomsday scenario.

They spread the gospel through DVDs, CDs, and books filled with conspiracy theories about UFOs, lost continents, demonic warfare, and miracle cures for the coronavirus, according to The New York Times.

In recent years, Aeba has worked to expand the party’s reach by forming an alliance with prominent conservative in the US, including former Trump adviser Steve Bannon and ACU chief Matt Schlapp. From left: Schlapp, LibertyWorks President Andrew Cooper, and Aeba at CPAC in February 2020 in Maryland

In recent years, Aeba has worked to expand the party’s reach by forming an alliance with prominent conservative in the US, including former Trump adviser Steve Bannon and ACU chief Matt Schlapp. From left: Schlapp, LibertyWorks President Andrew Cooper, and Aeba at CPAC in February 2020 in Maryland

For a $400 fee, Happy Science offers ‘spiritual vaccines’ in which would-be followers are blessed with a ritual prayer that would prevent infection while also curing those who have contracted the virus.

Okawa has reportedly long sought to make Happy Science not just a spiritual-religious group but also a political movement.

Aeba, who is a board member of Happy Science, is also the founder of its political wing, the Happiness Realization Party, whose stated goal is to increase Japan’s population by 300 million people and rapidly rearm itself to go to war with China and North Korea.

The party hasn’t gained much of a foothold in Japan. In the 12 years of its existence, it has failed to win a single seat in parliament.

In recent years, Aeba has worked to expand the party’s reach by forming an alliance with prominent conservative in the US, including former Trump adviser Steve Bannon and ACU chief Matt Schlapp.

The Republican Party has been criticized for its willingness to solicit support from groups that propagate various conspiracy theories, including QAnon, ‘Pizzagate’, and birtherism. 

QAnon followers espouse an intertwined series of beliefs, based on anonymous web postings from ‘Q,’ who claims to have insider knowledge of the now-defunct Trump administration.

A core tenet of the conspiracy theory is that during his presidency, Trump was secretly fighting a cabal of child-sex predators that includes prominent Democrats, Hollywood elites and ‘deep state’ allies.

‘Pizzagate’ is a conspiracy theory which stemmed from a fake online report that a Washington, DC pizza restaurant was cover for a child sex trafficking ring run by prominent Democrats and Hollywood stars.

Birtherism is the belief that Obama faked his birth certificate and was actually born abroad. 


Source link

Related Articles

Back to top button