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Korean-American mom’s kid-friendly lesson about racism against Asians goes viral

A Seattle mother’s kid-friendly lesson about racism against Asians is going viral. 

Jane Park, a second-generation Korean American, regularly broaches series topics with her seven-year-old son Bennett and five-year-old daughter Ruby, but last week felt compelled to have several important discussions with them about racism against Asians in the US.

She shared one of those age-appropriate lessons on TikTok and Instagram, where it’s been viewed 1.4 million times and earned praise from viewers. 

Mom TikTok: Jane Park, a second-generation Korean American, regularly broaches series topics with her seven-year-old son Bennett and five-year-old daughter Ruby

Viral: Last week, she shared a video of a lesson she had with her kids about racism against Asians

Viral: Last week, she shared a video of a lesson she had with her kids about racism against Asians

The children read as she holds up the words one by one: 'Stop Asian hate. Hate is a virus'

The children read as she holds up the words one by one: 'Stop Asian hate. Hate is a virus'

Kid-friendly: The children read as she holds up the words one by one: ‘Stop Asian hate. Hate is a virus’

Following the March 16 shooting in Atlanta, in which eight people were killed, Jane sat down with her children to talk about the mass shooting and the wider issue of growing violence against Asians in the US. 

‘In the three short months of 2021, I’ve had more difficult conversations with my kids than I ever had with my own parents,’ she explained. 

‘It breaks my heart to have them, and I don’t know what the right way is, except to falter and and be awkward, and try to process together.’

This month, she filmed one of those talks for social media to encourage other parents to have similar conversations with their own children. 

In this talk, she stages a sight word test in which she holds up words on pieces of paper and has her kids read them out loud. 

‘There’s a message in this one, so I want you to think about it,’ she tells them.

The children read as she holds up the words one by one: ‘Stop Asian hate. Hate is a virus.’  

'There's a message in this one, so I want you to think about it,' she tells them

'There's a message in this one, so I want you to think about it,' she tells them

‘There’s a message in this one, so I want you to think about it,’ she tells them

'In the three short months of 2021, I’ve had more difficult conversations with my kids than I ever had with my own parents,' she explained

'It breaks my heart to have them, and I don’t know what the right way is, except to falter and and be awkward, and try to process together'

‘In the three short months of 2021, I’ve had more difficult conversations with my kids than I ever had with my own parents,’ she explained

Lessons: When she asks her kids why she would call hate a virus, her son answers, 'Because viruses infect people'

Lessons: When she asks her kids why she would call hate a virus, her son answers, ‘Because viruses infect people’

When she asks her kids why she would call hate a virus, her son answers, ‘Because viruses infect people.’

‘Do you think hate can do the same thing?’ she asks, to which her kids say that it cane make people feel bad. 

‘We talked about recent acts of violence against Asian Americans. How did that make you feel?’ she asks.

Her son says it made him feel ‘sad because they killed people. They killed Asian people.’

‘And that could be somebody that we know, right? How do you think we should respond to things like that?’ Jane asks. 

‘We can speak out against it,’ she answers herself. ‘We can talk about it. We can build awareness, right? Because not everybody might know what’s going on.’

Jane’s video has quickly racked up thousands of likes from other social media users who have heard her message: ‘My fellow Asian American parents, I’m grieving and standing with you today. Let us better equip our kids for the world they will inherit and shape.’

'We talked about recent acts of violence against Asian Americans,' she said. 'How do you think we should respond to things like that?'

‘We talked about recent acts of violence against Asian Americans,’ she said. ‘How do you think we should respond to things like that?’

'We can speak out against it,' she answers herself

'We can talk about it. We can build awareness, right? Because not everybody might know what's going on'

‘We can speak out against it,’ she answers herself. ‘We can talk about it. We can build awareness, right? Because not everybody might know what’s going on’

'I realize the reason why I'm hesitant having these explicit conversations is I feel uncomfortable, but our kids are watching us and taking cues from us,' she said

Of her kids, she said: 'I really feel like that's going to help them build a framework on how to deal with it or address it when they get older'

‘I realize the reason why I’m hesitant having these explicit conversations is I feel uncomfortable, but our kids are watching us and taking cues from us,’ she said

The mother-of-two stressed out important it is to have tough conversations with kids, because they are always watching and learning. 

‘I realize the reason why I’m hesitant having these explicit conversations is I feel uncomfortable, but our kids are watching us and taking cues from us,’ she told Good Morning America.

‘By no fault of my parents, I grew up internalizing what it means to be Asian in America,’ she went on. 

‘So, I feel it’s incumbent upon me to start conversations young so when they have to encounter this, God forbid overt forms of racism or aggression … or see to anyone else encountering it, they can say, “I remember talking about this with my mom and dad and I can speak up.

‘I want them to recognize that it’s not always going to be in their face. These things start with jokes or comments. [I want them] to know how to process that or call it out. 

‘I really feel like that’s going to help them build a framework on how to deal with it or address it when they get older.’  


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