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Larger timepieces are bought by women as the line between the sexes blurs

Time for a change… it’s the gender-fluid watch: Larger timepieces are bought by women as the line between the sexes blurs

  • The number of larger watches being sold to women has grown by 23 per cent
  • Report by Watches of Switzerland Group highlighted the rise of unisex watches
  • Watchmakers traditionally produced designs for either men or women, but line is now blurring


Given today’s gender-fluid times, the rise of the unisex watch was perhaps inevitable.

Watch-makers have traditionally produced designs for either men or women, but now it seems the line between the sexes is blurring.

A report by the Watches of Switzerland Group revealed the number of larger watches – over 28mm – sold to women has increased from 39 per cent to 62 per cent. 

A report by the Watches of Switzerland Group revealed the number of larger watches – over 28mm – sold to women has increased from 39 per cent to 62 per cent (stock image)

The typical size of a woman’s watch is between 24mm and 28mm.

The unisex watch debate was recently highlighted when Cara Barrett, 35, a luxury watch expert, wrote in online magazine Hodinkee: ‘I see watches that were marketed to men but that I happen to like.

‘It’s enough to make me wonder, why are these considered men’s watches at all? Why aren’t they just… watches?’ 

Ms Barrett, who is the founder of the children’s genderless watch brand Parchie, told The Mail on Sunday last night: ‘Genderless watches will open up the conversation to everyone, instead of telling each demographic what they should wear. A watch is a watch.’

Watch-makers have traditionally produced designs for either men or women, but now it seems the line between the sexes is blurring (stock image)

Watch-makers have traditionally produced designs for either men or women, but now it seems the line between the sexes is blurring (stock image)

Hanushka Toni, the co-founder of fashion platform Sellier Knightsbridge, said: ‘Interestingly, women are requesting larger vintage models that were originally designed as watches for men.

‘However, we are not yet seeing the trend work the other way. We are not yet seeing men buying watches designed for women.’

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