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Marjorie Taylor Greene asks if America should have a ‘national divorce’ between red and blue states

Marjorie Taylor Greene asks Twitter if America should have a ‘national divorce’ after poll suggested more than half of Trump voters want red and blue states to secede

  • Representative Marjorie Taylor Greene conducted a poll on her Twitter asking if America should have a ‘national divorce’ between red and blue states 
  • 50.8% of respondents said ‘yes’ and 38.7% said ‘no’ while 10.5% are ‘undecided’
  • The poll has 18,680 respondents so far and another two days until it closes
  • Some accused Greene of inciting violence or advocating for a civil war 
  • The Twitter poll comes after a survey this month showed 52% of Trump voters want red states to secede while 41% of Biden voters want blue states to split off


Representative Marjorie Taylor Greene conducted a poll on her Twitter asking if America should have a ‘national divorce’ between red and blue states

Marjorie Taylor Greene conducted a poll on her Twitter asking her followers if they feel America should divide into two different nations based on red and blue states.

‘Should America have a national divorce?’ the Republican Georgia congresswoman posed on Monday.

The three options are ‘Yes, by R & D states’, ‘No, stay together’ and ‘Undecided’.

More than 18,500 people have cast a vote as of Tuesday morning and there are still two days remaining in the polling period set out by Greene.

So far, a simple majority of survey respondents – 50.8 per cent – claim they want the country divided. Another 38.7 per cent say they want all U.S. states to stay together and 10.5 per cent say they don’t know.

Greene, a Donald Trump loyalist, has 448,300 followers on her personal Twitter and more than 331,800 on her official congressional account.

Some Twitter users suggested in response to the poll tweet that the representative is inciting a civil war with her poll.

‘Are you suggesting civil war for real?’ one user asked in the comments beneath Greene’s tweet.

Of the 18,680 so far, 50.8% said 'yes', they want America to divide by states' party alignment, while 38.7% say they want the country to 'stay together'

Of the 18,680 so far, 50.8% said ‘yes’, they want America to divide by states’ party alignment, while 38.7% say they want the country to ‘stay together’

Many commented on the poll, claiming Greene is calling for a civil war, while others pointed out how some states change color regularly in federal elections

Many commented on the poll, claiming Greene is calling for a civil war, while others pointed out how some states change color regularly in federal elections

Another wrote: ‘just straight up calling for civil war are we?’

One user tagged the FBI and said they are reporting the tweet for ‘inciting violence.’

Greene’s poll comes after a poll revealed earlier this month that more than half of Trump voters want red states to secede from the union, while 41 per cent of Biden voters want blue states to split off.

The analysis from the University of Virginia’s Center for Politics notes that 52 per cent of Trump voters at least somewhat agree with the statement: ‘The situation is such that I would favor [Blue/Red] states seceding from the union to form their own separate country.’

Twenty-five percent of Trump voters strongly agree with the statement.

Meanwhile, 41 per cent of Biden voters at least somewhat agree with the same sentiment, while 18 per cent strongly agree.

Another poll taken earlier this month shows 52% of Trump voters agree with secession while 41% of Biden voters at least somewhat agree with the sentiment

Another poll taken earlier this month shows 52% of Trump voters agree with secession while 41% of Biden voters at least somewhat agree with the sentiment

84% of Trump voters at least somewhat agree Biden voters are a danger to democracy and 80% of Biden voters at least somewhat agree Trump voters are a danger to democracy

84% of Trump voters at least somewhat agree Biden voters are a danger to democracy and 80% of Biden voters at least somewhat agree Trump voters are a danger to democracy

More surprisingly, over 40 per cent of voters in both parties favor abolishing the checks and balances built into the federal government and instead handing essentially full control to the president.

Forty-six percent of Biden voters at least somewhat agreed, 22 per cent strongly, with the statement: ‘It would be better for America if whoever is president could take needed actions without being constrained by Congress or the courts.’ Forty-four percent of Trump voters at least somewhat agreed, while 19 per cent strongly agree.

Trump and Biden voters agreed in the survey that democracy is still preferable to any other governing system – at least 80 per cent of them do.

Over 75 per cent of Trump and Biden voters agreed with the statement: ‘I believe that Americans who strongly support the [OPP_PARTY] have become a clear and present danger to the American way of life.’

Seventy-five percent of Biden voters at least somewhat agreed with the statement, as did 78 per cent of Trump voters.

Can a state can secede? How the Civil War and a 1869 SCOTUS decision confirmed the U.S. is ‘indivisible’ (but is there any chance it could change?) 

The last time a group of states tried to secede from the Union was more than 150 years ago – an event that triggered the American Civil War. 

Seven slave states located in the Deep South – South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, and Texas- seceded on Feb. 8, 1861. They were later joined by Virginia, Arkansas, Tennessee, and North Carolina.

The South’s defeat was largely seen as establishing precedent against the right of a state to secede, though the Constitution does not directly mention secession. 

Late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia put the matter to rest more than a century later when responding in 2006 to a question from  a screenwriter asking if there was legal basis for secession. 

‘The answer is clear,’ Scalia wrote. ‘If there was any constitutional issue resolved by the Civil War, it is that there is no right to secede. (Hence, in the Pledge of Allegiance, ‘one Nation, indivisible.’)’ 

In Texas v. White (1869), the Supreme Court held that the US was an ‘indestructible union’ from which no state can secede. 

The decision did leave open the possibility of secession through ‘revolution, or through consent of the States.’

Some point to the Declaration of Independence for the right to ‘revolution’: 

‘We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.—That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, —That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness.’

Earlier this year, Texas Republican State Rep. Kyle Biedermann introduced a bill to create a to ‘develop a plan for achieving Texas independence,’ though the bill has not come up for a vote. 

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