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Michigan boy, 10, to have both legs amputated after rare MIS-C diagnosis following COVID infection

A 10-year-old Michigan boy will need to have both his legs amputated after he was diagnosed with a rare condition resulting from coronavirus.   

Dae’Shun Jamison, 10, of Shelby, Michigan, had tested positive for COVID-19 early in December 2020, but ‘did not have one symptom,’ his mother, Brittney Autman told MLive.com – until December 20, when he started getting headaches.  

He was admitted to the hospital on December 21 with a temperature of 103 degrees and then was diagnosed with multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children, also known as MIS-C – a rare, overactive immune response that leads to inflammation of various body parts, including the heart, lungs, kidneys, brain, skin, eyes, or gastrointestinal organs. 

Jamison

Dae’Shun Jamison, 10 (pictured), was diagnosed with MIS-C less than a month after he tested positive for COVID-19. The rare syndrome leads to inflammation of various body parts

The CDC notes that although it’s unknown what causes MIS-C, many children who are diagnosed with it either had COVID-19 or were in proximity with someone who had the virus.  

Jamison had to be put on a ventilator on Christmas Eve, as his heart was left overworking and his organs began shutting down.   

Jamison was also put on dialysis and hooked up to an ECMO machine, which added oxygen to his blood and pumped it through his body. 

While intubated, Jamison lost circulation in his hands and feet and his legs swelled up with fluids. The damage was so severe that he had to have a leg amputated because he had no movement or feeling left in them, his doctors said. 

Autman began chronicling Jamison’s conditions in updates in a GoFundMe that she had started to raise money because she is unable to work while she’s at the hospital and also caring for her seven-year-old daughter.   

While intubated, Jamison lost circulation in his hands and feet and his legs swelled up with fluids, which left his legs with no movement or feeling in them

While intubated, Jamison lost circulation in his hands and feet and his legs swelled up with fluids, which left his legs with no movement or feeling in them

Jamison's mother, Brittany Autman (pictured with Jamison), has been chronicling his health updates in a GoFundMe since the end of December 2020

Jamison’s mother, Brittany Autman (pictured with Jamison), has been chronicling his health updates in a GoFundMe since the end of December 2020

Autman said that her goal is for Jamison (pictured) to be able to walk with prosthetics

Jamison

Autman said that her goal is for Jamison (pictured) to be able to walk with prosthetics

She wrote of his needing to have his fingertips and toes amputated in a December 30, 2020, update. A few days later, on January 3, she wrote that his lungs were strong enough for him to be taken off the ventilator. 

But then, on January 12, she wrote: ‘Dae’Shun have to get both of his legs amputated Friday and his kidneys are not doing to good. Because of his autism he have no clue on what’s is going to happen.’

In a January 14 update, Autman wrote that her son would be getting his right leg amputated, but that doctors would wait to amputate his left leg, ‘because it’s not as bad as the right. They are hoping that they can save majority of his left leg and maybe even half of his foot.’

WHAT IS MIS-C?

MIS-C stands for multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children.

It’s a rare, overactive immune response that leads to inflammation of various body parts, including the heart, lungs, kidneys, brain, skin, eyes, or gastrointestinal organs.  

It results from the over-production of cytokines, known as a cytokine storm – the overreaction of the body’s immune system.

In a storm, the proteins start to attack healthy tissue, which can cause blood vessels to leak and lead to low blood pressure

Doctors say this also happens with Ebola, causing the body to go into shock.

It has also been noted in adult COVID-19 patients. 

Symptoms of MIS-C may include fever, abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, neck pain, rash, bloodshot eyes or feeling unusually tired.

MIS-C conditions typically begin to develop between two to eight weeks after COVID-19 infection. 

As of January 8, there have been 1,659 cases of MIS-C reported in the US, with 26 deaths from the syndrome. 

More than 70% of the cases occurred in Latino or black children, with the average age of children affected being eight years old, according to the CDC.

She wrote that she and the doctors explained to Jamison that he needed to have his right leg amputated and that he ‘understood everything’ and that ‘when he wake up his leg will not look the same.’

‘Dae’Shun completely broke down in tears which effected me in so many ways, I can’t believe this is really happening to my baby,’ Autman wrote.  

After the amputation, Autman revealed that the surgery went well, but that ‘In a few weeks’ his left leg would need to be amputated as well. 

‘I am struggling with this so much please keep the prayers coming,’ she wrote. 

In her latest update, on January 19, Autman wrote that the stump of his right left was healing well and that he’d eventually need a skin graft. 

She also wrote that he has had a blood clot in the artery of his right hand for more than two weeks and that he has been on blood thinners, which hadn’t been working.  

‘It was really hard. I just think about like, once it’s done, what will his life be afterwards? He likes to play soccer, and he likes to do things. And it’s just hard,’ Autman told Fox 17

She said that the goal is for him to be able to walk with prosthetics but that she is taking things one day at a time. 

Doctors at Spectrum Health’s Helen Devos Children’s Hospital, in Grand Rapids, Michigan, where he’s being treated, said that Jamison’s case of MIS-C is the worst they’ve seen in the state. 

Of the Spectrum network’s 5,000 pediatric patients who’ve had positive coronavirus test results, only 21 patients have been treated for MIS-C. 

Symptoms of MIS-C may include fever, abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, neck pain, rash, bloodshot eyes or feeling unusually tired.

MIS-C conditions typically begin to develop between two to eight weeks after COVID-19 infection, Spectrum Health pediatric infectious diseases physician and division chief Dr. Rosemary Olivero told the news station.  

Jamison didn’t have any COVID symptoms and his MIS-C symptoms didn’t develop until after the two-week infection period.   

‘There’s thought that there could be a genetic trigger, but we just don’t know yet what that genetic trigger is or if it affects some populations more than others,’ Olivero said.  

‘We’ve seen MIS-C happen to children of all pediatric ages, races, and genders as well. So there’s still quite a bit that we are learning.’ 

As of January 8, there have been 1,659 cases of MIS-C reported in the US, with 26 deaths from the syndrome, according to Calmatters.org.  

More than 70% of the cases occurred in Latino or black children, with the average age of children affected being eight years old, according to the CDC. 


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