US

NYC population jumps 600,000 in a decade to 8.8 million

New York City‘s population has jumped to a whopping 8.8 million after the Big Apple gained more residents over the last decade thank many other major cities combined. 

From 2010 to 2020, it welcomed 629,057 new New Yorkers to the five boroughs, more than the total number of people who moved to Los Angeles, Houston, Dallas and Phoenix during the same period.

The newest data, compiled during the worst of the COVID-19 crisis last Spring, was release by the US Census Bureau released on Thursday.

Officials in the Big Apple had feared a population drop as the pandemic worsened, which could have affected federal aid, while New York City served as an unwanted epicenter. 

‘Substantial and surprising,’ said Steven Romalewski, an expert in city demographics at the CUNY’s Graduate Center. 

‘It’s really impressive to see this kind of growth against the backdrop of the pandemic — and not only the claims that everyone was making about people leaving the city leaving the droves, but also collecting all the data during the pandemic.’

People are seen walking through Times Square in New York, where a 7.7 percent increase in population from 2010 to 2020 made the total jump to 8.8 million

People are seen walking through Times Square in New York, where a 7.7 percent increase in population from 2010 to 2020 made the total jump to 8.8 million

People with and without masks walk on a crowded boardwalk at Coney Island on Memorial Day in the Brooklyn Borough of New York on May 31

People with and without masks walk on a crowded boardwalk at Coney Island on Memorial Day in the Brooklyn Borough of New York on May 31

The United States’ top 10 most populated cities 

1. New York, NY – 8.8 million

2. Los Angeles, CA – 4.1 million

3. Chicago, IL – 2.6 million

4. Houston, TX – 2.4 million

5. Phoenix, AZ – 1.7 million

6. Philadelphia, PA – 1.6 million

7. San Antonio, TX – 1.5 million

8. San Diego, CA – 1.4 million

The surge in New York’s population amounts to a 7.7 percent increase, a figure helping to dispel theories that the pandemic would take a permanent, and big, bite out of the Big Apple. 

‘I’m surprised — very surprised by that. I thought the flow of population was heading out,’ Mike C., an actor who lives in Brooklyn, told New York Post.

The outlet reports that the other top ten US cities saw increases in their respective populations, none of which came close to the spike in New York City.

After Gotham, Houston saw 205,000 new faces move to the city over the same time frame, with the populations of Los Angeles increasing by 106,000 people and Dallas by 107,000. 

Meanwhile, Philadelphia, the only other northeast city besides New York to break into the top ten, picked up a far more modest 78,000.

And while Chicago gained a meager 54,000 people over that ten year period, bringing the total population to 2.7 million, the figure is far more impressive considering the city was losing residents a decade ago.  

As for the five boroughs, Brooklyn remains the fastest-growing in New York, seeing a 9.2 percent increase of 231,374 new residents from 2010 to last year, making the overall borough population 2.7 million, making Brooklyn the same size as Chicago population-wise.

The next fastest-growing borough was Queens, which increased by 174,742 people to bring the total population to 2.4 million.  

Shoppers enjoy Manhattan, as new figures show that New York's population rocketed by close to 700,000 in the last decade

Shoppers enjoy Manhattan, as new figures show that New York’s population rocketed by close to 700,000 in the last decade 

Perhaps most unsurprisingly, Staten Island remains the city’s slowest growing borough, with the smallest borough in New York only adding 27,012 new residents to the island. The population is now 496,000 after the modest 5.8 increase. 

‘People are always going to come to New York. It’s not one of those cities that dies, you know,’ Brooklynite Nick Ambro told the Post.

‘Many bad things have happened to this city, and it still kept going.’

America’s white population is shrinking: 2020 Census reveals whites make up less than 60% for the first time and there are nearly 20m less than in 2010

The 2020 Census has revealed that America’s white population is shrinking and is now less than 60 percent for the first time on record, with nearly 20million fewer white Americans alive today than ten years ago.

White Americans make up 57.8 percent of the country, according to the data that was released on Thursday, a decrease of over 6 percent since 2010. 

That is the number of people who replied ‘white alone, non Hispanic or Latino’ to the survey. Another group who just answered ‘white alone’ make up 61 percent of the country, according to a data map. 

The white population is still the largest in the country at 204.3 million, but that number is down from 223.6 million in 2010.

The second largest group is Hispanics which makes up 62million, or 18 percent. The third are African Americans, which represent 12.1 percent of the country. That is down from 13 percent in the 2010 census. 

Generally, the population is becoming more diverse with people responding that they are of ‘some other race’ than white, black, Hispanic, native American, Asian, or Pacific Islander, than before. 

The only states where the majority of the population is non-white are California (Hispanic majority of 39.4%), DC (black majority of 40.9%), Hawaii (Asian majority of 36.5%), New Mexico (Hispanic majority of 47.7%) and Puerto Rico, which has a population that is 98% Hispanic. 

White Americans make up 57.8 percent of the country, according to the data that was released on Thursday, a decrease of over 6 percent since 2010. That is the number of people who replied 'white alone, non Hispanic or Latino' to the survey. Another group who just answered 'white alone' make up 61 percent of the country, according to a data map.

White Americans make up 57.8 percent of the country, according to the data that was released on Thursday, a decrease of over 6 percent since 2010. That is the number of people who replied ‘white alone, non Hispanic or Latino’ to the survey. Another group who just answered ‘white alone’ make up 61 percent of the country, according to a data map.

White Americans still make up the largest ethnic group in the country but it's a community that is shrinking in size. There are 19million fewer white Americans in this census than in the 2010 census

White Americans still make up the largest ethnic group in the country but it’s a community that is shrinking in size. There are 19million fewer white Americans in this census than in the 2010 census 

CENSUS SNAPSHOT 

– White population has shrunk by 5million from 2010 to 2020 and is now 57.8% 

– Phoenix has grown the fastest of any city in the country

– NYC remains the largest city by population with 8.8million 

– Vermont is the whitest state, with 95.5% of the population 

– DC is the only state where the majority of residents are black  

Vermont is the whitest state, with 95.5% of residents reporting to be white.  

‘Twenty years ago if you told people this was going to be the case, they wouldn’t have believed you.

‘The country is changing dramatically,’ William Frey, a researcher at the Brookings Institution told The Washington Post of the data.

The data also offered new details on the country’s slowing rate of population growth, which is lower than it has been at any time aside from the 1930s. 

More than half of all U.S. counties lost population from 2010 to 2020, census officials said.

New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Houston and Phoenix are the five largest U.S. cities; Phoenix, which grew faster than any other city in the top 10, surpassed Philadelphia.

The fastest-growing cities across the U.S. are in suburban areas, data showed. Buckeye, a suburb of Phoenix, saw its population increase by nearly 80% to lead the nation.

The Villages, a retirement community in Florida, is the fastest-growing metro area in the country, the census said.

The release arrived months later than originally expected after the census took longer to complete due to the coronavirus pandemic. The delay has forced some states to go to court to postpone their redistricting deadlines.

States use the data to redraw district lines for the U.S. House of Representatives after each decennial census, based on where people now reside.

The number of people who responded that they were 'white alone, not hispanic' represented 57.8% of the country but a map of the country shows 71 percent said 'white alone or in combination with another race'. This map shows where the highest white populations are

The number of people who responded that they were ‘white alone, not hispanic’ represented 57.8% of the country but a map of the country shows 71 percent said ‘white alone or in combination with another race’. This map shows where the highest white populations are 

The highest African American populations are in the south. DC has the highest black population, at 40.9 percent

The highest African American populations are in the south. DC has the highest black population, at 40.9 percent 

The largest hispanic populations are along the border and in Florida, where 25% or more of the state population is hispanic

The largest hispanic populations are along the border and in Florida, where 25% or more of the state population is hispanic

The Asian population is among the smallest of any race. The only state where more than 20 percent reported being Asian was Hawaii

The Asian population is among the smallest of any race. The only state where more than 20 percent reported being Asian was Hawaii 

American Indian or Native American populations are in northern states like Montana and South Dakota and southern states like New Mexico and Oklahoma

American Indian or Native American populations are in northern states like Montana and South Dakota and southern states like New Mexico and Oklahoma

In April, the bureau published state-level figures, showing that Texas, Florida and North Carolina – all states controlled by Republicans – will gain congressional seats next year based on increased populations.

Electoral analysts have said Republicans could potentially erase the Democrats’ thin advantage in the House through redistricting alone.

Some experts have questioned whether the census data may have undercounted certain populations, given both the pandemic as well as the Trump administration’s unsuccessful effort to add a citizenship question to the survey.

 Civil rights groups had expressed concern that the failed attempt could nevertheless have dissuaded some immigrants from filling out census forms.

‘While no data is perfect, we are confident that today’s redistricting results meet our high data quality standards,’ Ron Jarmin, the bureau’s acting director, said on Thursday.


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