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NYC tops 2,000 cases and hits seven-day positivity rate of 5.43% positivity rate

As coronavirus cases and hospitalizations continue to spike in New York City, Mayor Bill de Blasio urged high-risk groups to not go outside.

In a tweet on Friday, the Mayor wrote that the city recorded 2,041 new COVID-19 infections and 134 new hospitalizations.

Additionally, the seven-rolling average positivity rate hit 5.43 percent, which is the highest figure seen in six months.

‘If you’re a senior or have a pre-existing medical condition, stay home as much as possible this weekend. This is a serious situation,’ de Blasio tweeted.  

New York City recorded 2,041 new coronavirus cases and hit a seven-day rolling average positivity rate of 5.43%, which is the highest rate in six months. Pictured: People watch the holiday lights at Saks Fifth Avenue in New York City, December 3

Additionally, 134 residents were hospitalized, which is close to the warning maker indicating the pandemic is out of control in the city of 200 new hospitalizations per day

Additionally, 134 residents were hospitalized, which is close to the warning maker indicating the pandemic is out of control in the city of 200 new hospitalizations per day

Mayor Bill de Blasio warned that New Yorkers with pre-existing conditions and those above age 65 stay home this weekend

Mayor Bill de Blasio warned that New Yorkers with pre-existing conditions and those above age 65 stay home this weekend

In a second tweet, de Blasio encouraged residents to follow mitigation measures such as wearing a mask and social distancing.

‘We’ve learned a lot from the spring when it comes to treating this virus. But we can’t let up,’ he wrote.

In August, de Blasio announced three warning markers to determine whether or not the city’s pandemic situation was under control.

Health officials set the threshold for the seven-day average number of new cases at 550 and a five percent positivity rate.

Both those numbers have been surpassed and the average number of daily cases is now almost at 2,000 for the first time since April.

Additionally, with 134 patients admitted to the hospital, the number is inching closer to the third warning marker, which is a threshold of 200 daily hospitalizations.

Meanwhile, in New York State, there were 11,271 new cases and 60 new deaths recorded with a seven-day rolling average positivity rate of 4.79 percent.

Earlier this week, de Blasio said the city was getting ready to vaccinate healthcare workers and nursing home residents once the inoculations are approved. 

Pfizer Inc’s vaccine is set to arrive in the city on December 15 and Moderna Inc’s jab is planned for December 22, both pending US Food and Drug Administration authorization.  

After healthcare workers and nursing homes, officials will attempt to get the shots to the neighborhoods most deeply affected by the virus. 

‘It will obviously take months,’ de Blasio said, adding that more doses  will be arriving in the city weekly. 

‘It’s quite clear at this point that this second wave unfortunately is right upon us. We are seeing a different reality for the hospitals for sure than in the spring. The ability of our hospitals to handle this has greatly improved, not as much stress on our ICUs.’ 

Currently, New York City is preparing to receive 320,000 doses, and can store up to 1.5 million doses.  

 Meanwhile, health experts have warned the upcoming winter could be the most difficult time we have witnessed thus far.

CDC director Dr Robert Redfield said the next few months could be ‘the most difficult in the public health history of this nation.’

At an event hosted by the US Chamber of Commerce on Wednesday, he said 90 percent of US hospitals are in ‘hot zones’ and 90 percent of long-term care facilities are in regions with high levels of transmission.

‘So we are at a very critical time right now about being able to maintain the resilience of our health-care system,’ Redfield said.

‘The reality is December and January and February are going to be rough times. I actually believe they’re going to be the most difficult in the public health history of this nation, largely because of the stress that’s going to be put on our health-care system.’


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