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Rudy Giuliani cosplays as Abraham Lincoln in an effort to get out the vote

Rudy Giuliani chose a bizarre way to encourage Virginia voters to elect Republican gubernatorial candidate Glenn Youngkin – by posting a cringe-worthy video of himself as Abraham Lincoln.

In a tweet Tuesday night, the former New York City mayor posted a video of himself with an Abraham Lincoln filter over himself as he encouraged voters not to pick Democratic gubernatorial candidate Terry McAuliffe.

‘Virginia, vote against the man who dishonored our past by selling my bedroom hundreds and hundreds of times to scoundrels in a pay-for-play scheme,’ he said in his best impersonation of the 16th president.

‘In my time, we had a name for people who sold their bedrooms for one night,’ he continued. ‘In your time the name is Terry McAuliffe.

‘End the Clinton sleaze once and for all,’ he concluded.

In a tweet Tuesday afternoon, Rudy Giuliani posted a video of himself with an Abraham Lincoln filter over his face as he tried to encourage Virginia voters not to elect Democratic gubernatorial candidate Terry McAuliffe

Terry McAuliffe was caught up in a scandal during the Clinton administration after he sent a memo to the White House encouraging the president to reward top Democratic donors

He is facing Republican candidate Glenn Youngkin (pictured) in the Virginia gubernatorial race

The tweet was meant to get out the vote for Republican candidate Glenn Youngkin, right, who is facing McAuliffe, left, in the gubernatorial election

The video was apparently in reference to a Clinton-era scandal over a plan to let top Democratic donors stay in the Lincoln Bedroom at the White House – a controversy that originated with a memo McAuliffe sent to a White House official. 

The former president had been bombarded with questions about reports that dozens of prominent Democratic donors, some of whom gave upwards of $100,000 each, were rewarded with overnight stays in the Lincoln Bedroom, when a memo McAuliffe sent the White House emerged.

One White House official told the Associated Press at the time that the memo, which was signed by Clinton, showed he ‘supported the idea that his friends and supporters, especially those who had supported him in the past… should be encouraged to do so in the future with a night over at the White House or attending White House events.

But McAuliffe, then a finance chairman for the Clinton-Gore campaign, said his memo did not specifically propose White House stays but did recommend that Democratic donors demoralized after the 1994 election losses ‘get in, whether it be breakfast, lunch, dinner, coffee or something else.’

After it came to light, White House Press Secretary Mike McCurry said: ‘Terry McAuliffe’s memo makes it pretty plain that there was a desire in the aftermath of 1994 to address concerns that contributors had in the party that… no one was being very gracious for the support they gave the party – no one remained in contact with them.

‘The president agreed to address the situation,’ he said, adding: ‘The president was enthusiastic about having his friends and supporters [in] the Lincoln Bedroom.’

Clinton later defended himself in an interview, saying: ‘I don’t think it’s a bad thing for a president to invite his strong supporters to stay in the White House.

‘And I think it would be a bad thing for anyone to be told “If you give such and such amount of money, we’ll let you spend the night in the Lincoln Bedroom.”‘

During the Clinton administration, McAuliffe sent the White House a memo encouraging the president to reward top Democratic donors, and he soon started letting them stay overnight in the Lincoln Bedroom

During the Clinton administration, McAuliffe sent the White House a memo encouraging the president to reward top Democratic donors, and he soon started letting them stay overnight in the Lincoln Bedroom

Giuliani, himself, though is facing controversy over his dealings with Ukraine and his statements about Dominion Voting Systems

Giuliani, himself, though is facing controversy over his dealings with Ukraine and his statements about Dominion Voting Systems

But Giuliani is not without controversy himself.

In the months leading up to Election Day, Giuliani took on a pressure campaign against the Ukrainian government to force it to open an investigation into the Bidens. 

Then, after the November election Giuliani helped spread wild claims about Dominion Voting Systems, a producer of voting machines, was financially backed by ‘communist money’ from Cuba and China.

And in April, federal agents raided his home, seizing 18 electronic devices belonging to him and his employees.

Now, his lawyers are trying to get a defamation lawsuit brought by a former employee of Dominion Voting Systems who claims they cost him his job dismissed. 

Eric Coomer, a former director of product strategy and security for the company, filed the lawsuit in Denver, Colorado last December.  

The lawsuit claims Coomer was driven into hiding by death threats after the Trump campaign and others publicized an unverified report saying Coomer told Antifa activists in a pre-election telephone call that the vote could be fixed for Joe Biden.

Attorney Andrew DeFranco, Giuliani attorney Joe Sibley and Trump campaign attorney Eric Holway argued their clients didn’t act with malice, that the report was public knowledge, and that Coomer was a public figure. 

They say those conditions that should preclude Coomer from prevailing in his defamation suit. 

However, Coomer says that their actions have ruined his life.  

‘Today I have filed a lawsuit in Colorado in an effort to unwind as much of the damage as possible done to me, my family, my life, and my livelihood as a result of the numerous false public statements that I was somehow responsible for ‘rigging’ the 2020 presidential election,’ Coomer said back when he filed suit.


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