US

Shocking satellite photos show how the Dixie wildfire swept through Greenville and obliterated it

Astonishing satellite photos show how the Dixie Fire – the largest wild blaze ever recorded in California – wiped the historic town of Greenville off the map. 

Satellite photos of Greenville show the historic town before the blaze on October 31, 2018. The image shows the town surrounded by lush green forest and many buildings. 

After Dixie ripped through the town, new satellite images from August 9 show a barren land with smoldering cars and buildings wiped out from the blaze. 

The lush forest surrounding the homes can now be seen burnt down and a smoky haze is heavy over the remains of the town. 

Dixie destroyed 75 per cent of Greenville, including family homes, small businesses and schools.  

The Dixie wildfire is has spread to 487,764 acres as of Tuesday evening and is not expected to be contained until August 30

California is to experience 90-degree heat this week with no chance of rain or wind. Dixie has been burning across California for nearly a month. Wildfires are up 200 per cent since last year in the state

California is to experience 90-degree heat this week with no chance of rain or wind. Dixie has been burning across California for nearly a month. Wildfires are up 200 per cent since last year in the state 

The fire has torn through more than 487,764 acres – roughly a 5,000-acre increase since Monday evening – in Butte, Plumas, Tehama and Lassen counties and has been ongoing for more than 27 days. More than 14,000 acres have been burned in the last 24 hours.

Close to 6,000 personnel have been assigned to fight off the devastating fire, but only 25 per cent of the blaze has been contained, officials have said.

At least 893 structures have been damaged and an estimated 16,000 homes are threatened by the blaze and 12,000 people have been evacuated. Fortunately, no fatalities have been reported. 

Democratic Governor Gavin Newsom has declared a state of emergency for counties affected by the Dixie Fire, as well as those affected by the McFarland and Monument Fires, which has collectively burned another 85,000 acres. 

Governor Newsom tweeted: ‘Our hearts ache for this town. 

‘Greenville — though this moment may seem insurmountable, we’ll be there to help you rebuild.’ 

Firefighters have been trying to contain the fire for nearly a month after it started on July 13. Only 25 per cent of the fire has been contained

Firefighters have been trying to contain the fire for nearly a month after it started on July 13. Only 25 per cent of the fire has been contained

Crews are trying to protect rural communities from the blaze that has already destroyed hundreds of homes for over a month

 Crews are trying to protect rural communities from the blaze that has already destroyed hundreds of homes for over a month

Governor Gavin Newsom has declared a state of emergency for the counties affected by Dixie and promises to help Greenville rebuild

Governor Gavin Newsom has declared a state of emergency for the counties affected by Dixie and promises to help Greenville rebuild

Governor Newsom has also declared a state of emergency for the counties affected by the McFarland and Monument Fires

Governor Newsom has also declared a state of emergency for the counties affected by the McFarland and Monument Fires

The McFarland and Monument fires have destroyed another 85,000 acres, in addition to Dixie's destruction of 487,764 acres

The McFarland and Monument fires have destroyed another 85,000 acres, in addition to Dixie’s destruction of 487,764 acres

Wildfires have burned more than 917,000 acres of California this year, which is more than a 200 per cent increase from last year.

California will be experiencing 90-degree heat this coming week with no chance of rain, however, wind is not expected to spread the fire.

Dixie isn’t expected to be contained for weeks. Cal Fire estimated the containment to be around August 30, according to the Los Angeles Times

A before and after series shows  a community center in flames in Greenville, California (above) and the damaged structure after the fire was put out (below)

A before and after series shows  a community center in flames in Greenville, California (above) and the damaged structure after the fire was put out (below)

A two store house burning (above) and the remaining ashes after the fire (below). Thousands have been evacuated and close to 900 structures have been destroyed

A two store house burning (above) and the remaining ashes after the fire (below). Thousands have been evacuated and close to 900 structures have been destroyed

The devastating blaze continues as 6,000 personnel are working to fight it off

The devastating blaze continues as 6,000 personnel are working to fight it off 

Four firefighters were injured when a tree branch fell on them while they battled with inclement weather conditions

Four firefighters were injured when a tree branch fell on them while they battled with inclement weather conditions

A station market in Greensville, California burned by the Dixie Fire, which  has spread across Butte, Plumas, Tehama and Lassen counties

A station market in Greensville, California burned by the Dixie Fire, which  has spread across Butte, Plumas, Tehama and Lassen counties

An American flag lies on the incinerated remains of a completely destroyed structure

An American flag lies on the incinerated remains of a completely destroyed structure

A house burning (above) on July 24 and its remains two days later on July 26 (below)

A house burning (above) on July 24 and its remains two days later on July 26 (below) 

Fortunately, the blaze has not claimed human lives

Fortunately, the blaze has not claimed human lives

Last year’s August Complex Fire scorched 1 million acres, twice as Dixie has so far, but it is considered a ‘Complex Fire’ because it was made up of multiple different lightning-sparked blazes. 

Dixie might have originated when a tree fell on one of the power lines of the Pacific Gas & Electric Company on July 13. The California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection were called to put out the initially small fire but poor roads and an unauthorized drone prevented the department from successfully mitigating the fire before darkness fell. 

On July 22, Dixie merged with the Fly Fire, while firefighters battled inclement weather conditions. Four firefighters were hurt when they were struck by a fallen branch.  

Firefighters have had to deal with people reluctant to leave – some of whom pulled guns on them – even as the wildfire continues to spread. Their refusals meant that firefighters spent precious time loading people into cars to ferry them out, said Jake Cagle, an incident management operations section chief.

‘We have firefighters that are getting guns pulled out on them, because people don’t want to evacuate,’ he said.

The Dixie Fire progressed through July and was briefly contained, before major wind exacerbated the blaze.  

The Dixie Fire is now California's largest ever, propagating through four counties

The Dixie Fire is now California’s largest ever, propagating through four counties 

Firefighters have faced a challenge of proportions as they dealt with arid weather and major winds

Firefighters have faced a challenge of proportions as they dealt with arid weather and major winds

The face of a horse toy left behind, disfigured by the flames of the Dixie Fire

The face of a horse toy left behind, disfigured by the flames of the Dixie Fire

Thousands were evacuated, leaving behind their homes and belongings

Thousands were evacuated, leaving behind their homes and belongings 

Don Crail, whose home burned down, is rushed into an ambulance for a medical issue in Greenville, California

Don Crail, whose home burned down, is rushed into an ambulance for a medical issue in Greenville, California

Two partially burned chairs sit among destroyed structures caused by the Dixie Fire. The fire burned down 75percent of  the town of Greenville

Two partially burned chairs sit among destroyed structures caused by the Dixie Fire. The fire burned down 75percent of  the town of Greenville

A firefighter from Huntington Beach looks up a mountainside after cutting a large tree

A firefighter from Huntington Beach looks up a mountainside after cutting a large tree

At least 163 water tenders have been employed in attempts to contain Dixie

At least 163 water tenders have been employed in attempts to contain Dixie

Flames emerge from a house in Greenville (above), as the house burns to the ground (below)

Flames emerge from a house in Greenville (above), as the house burns to the ground (below)

The Pacific Gas & Electric Company was ordered to provide details on the circumstances around the fire to a federal judge by August 16.    

More land has burned in the Dixie Fire than in the Creek Fire, in which 379,895 acres had scorched by the time it was 100% contained on Christmas Eve. 

At least 163 water tenders have been employed in attempts to contain Dixie, but the unforgiving blaze has incinerated 75percent of the structures in the town of Greenville. 

The fire, fueled by bone-dry vegetation and 40 mph gusts, raged through the community of Greenville, leveling most of its historic downtown and leaving blocks of homes in ashes.

The town’s historical museum, church, hotel, a bar and 100-year-old wooden buildings were destroyed. 

Assessment teams can not access many areas that have been affected, but preliminary reports account for 14,000 buildings being threatened in the northern Sierra Nevada, according to FOX.   

Firefighters from Huntington Beach talk about the days plans

Firefighters from Huntington Beach talk about the days plans

Firefighters from Huntington Beach survey a mountainside before extinguishing a small blaze

Firefighters from Huntington Beach survey a mountainside before extinguishing a small blaze

During and after the flames: A gas station market and a house burn down to ashes

During and after the flames: A gas station market and a house burn down to ashes 

California's wildfire season hit its worst recorded to date in 2020. More acres have been torched in 2021 than in 2020 in the period to date

California’s wildfire season hit its worst recorded to date in 2020. More acres have been torched in 2021 than in 2020 in the period to date

A car, and the Pioneer Café in Greenville were destroyed as a result of the Dixie Fire decimating the town

A car, and the Pioneer Café in Greenville were destroyed as a result of the Dixie Fire decimating the town

Unforgiving flames come out of a vehicle in Greenville (above). The frame of the car is all that's left after the fire has been put out (below), while the car next to it seems not to have been affected

Unforgiving flames come out of a vehicle in Greenville (above). The frame of the car is all that’s left after the fire has been put out (below), while the car next to it seems not to have been affected

The fire now convers an area larger than Los Angeles

The fire now convers an area larger than Los Angeles

The Way Station Bar in Greensville before and after it burned during the Dixie Fire

 The Way Station Bar in Greensville before and after it burned during the Dixie Fire 

The consequences to the environment are being felt across state lines. Even as far as 1,100 miles to the east of California, in Denver, Dixie has created a pall of smoke.  

The California fires have produced overwhelming levels of pollution and heat during what already was a summer with record-breaking temperatures. The New York Times reported that the air in Denver and Salt Lake City is now more harmful than Delhi’s and Beijing’s.    

This year California has faced an unparalleled fire season, set to surpass 2020’s, which is the worst recorded to date. By mid-July, 103,588 more acres had been scorched compared to the same period last year, according to Cal Fire.  

Top 20 most destructive California wildfires, from 2018’s Camp Fire which killed 85 to last year’s Creek blaze which razed 379,895 acres

  • Camp Fire (caused by fallen powerlines): November 2018, Butte county, 153,336 acres destroyed, 18,804 structures damaged, 85 deaths
  • Tubbs fire (Electrical): October 2017, Napa & Sonoma counties, 36,807 acres destroyed, 5,636 structures damaged, 22 deaths
  • Tunnel fire – Oakland Hills (Rekindle): October 1991, Alameda county, 1,600 acres destroyed, 2,900 structures damaged, 25 death
  • Cedar fire (Human Related): October 2003, San Diego county, 273,246 acres destroyed, 2,820 structures damaged, 15 deaths
  • North Complex fire (Under Investigation): August, 2020, Butte, Plumas, & Yuba counties, 318,935 acres destroyed, 2,352 structures damaged, 15 deaths
  • Valley fire (Electrical): September 2015, Lake, Napa & Sonoma counties, 76,067 acres destroyed, 1,955 structures damaged, 4 deaths
  • Witch fire (Powerlines): October 2007, San Diego county, 197,990 acres destroyed , 1,650 structures damaged, 2 deaths 
  • Woolsey fire (Under Investigation): November 2018, Ventura county, 96,949 acres destroyed, 1,643 structures damaged, 3 deaths  
  • Carr fire (Human Related): July 2018, Shasta County, Trinity 229,651 acres destroyed, 1,614 structures damaged, 8 deaths  
  • Glass Fire (Under Investigation ): September 2020, Napa & Sonoma counties,  67,484 acres destroyed, 1,520 structures damaged
  • LNU Lightning Complex fire (Under Investigation): August 2020 Napa, Solano, Sonoma, Yolo, Lake, & Colusa 363,220 1,491 6  
  • CZU Lightning Complex fire (Lightning): August 2020, Santa Cruz, San Mateo counties, 86,509 acres destroyed, 1,490 structures damaged, 1  death
  • Nuns fire (Powerline): October 2017, Sonoma county, 54,382 acres destroyed, 1,355 structures damaged, 3 deaths
  • Thomas fire (Powerline): December 2017, Ventura & Santa Barbara counties, 281,893 acres destroyed,  1,063 structures damaged, 2 deaths
  • Old fire (Human Related): October 2003, San Bernardino county, 91,281 acres destroyed, 1,003 structures damaged, 6 deaths
  • Jones fire (Undetermined): October 1999, Shasta county, 26,200 acres destroyed, 954 structures damaged, 1 death
  •  August Complex fire (Under Investigation): August 2020, Mendocino, Humboldt, Trinity, Tehama, Glenn, Lake, & Colusa counties, 1,032,648 acres destroyed, 935 structures damaged, 1 death
  • Butte (Powerlines): September 2015, Amador & Calaveras counties, 70,868 acres destroyed, 921 structures damaged, 2 deaths 
  • Dixie fire (Under Investigation): July 2021, Butte, Plumas, Lassen, & Tehama counties, 487,764 acres destroyed, 893 structures damaged  
  • Creek fire (Under Investigation): September 2020,  Fresno & Madera counties, 379,895 acres destroyed, 856 structures damaged 
  •  Source: Cal Fire

 


Source link

Related Articles

Back to top button