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Stargazers seek to explain the mysterious sighting that was seen over the Tri-State area

Did you see the fireball that shot across the sky? Stargazers seek to explain the mysterious sighting that was seen over the Tri-State area

  • A New Jersey resident captured the incredible footage of the bright fireball 
  • The dashcam footage shows the meteor which shot across Northeastern states
  •  A meteorologist in New Jersey reported a ‘bright, low flying meteor’ on Sunday

An unsuspecting New Jersey resident managed to capture incredible footage of a fireball that flashed across several Northeastern states over the weekend.  

The dashcam footage shows the bright meteor shoot across the sky on Sunday evening.

The resident spotted the fireball whilst driving on the Garden State Parkway, a highway in New Jersey. 

Another local captured footage of the rare sight in Lakewood, New Jersey. There are also reports of sightings throughout the East Coast and Canada.  

The fireball was spotted by a New Jersey resident and captured on dashcam footage

The fireball traveled from east to west with its visible flight ending near Poughkeepsie, New York, shortly after 7.20pm, according to the American Meteorological Society (AMS)

The fireball traveled from east to west with its visible flight ending near Poughkeepsie, New York, shortly after 7.20pm, according to the American Meteorological Society (AMS) 

The fireball traveled from east to west with its visible flight ending near Poughkeepsie, New York, shortly after 7.20pm, according to the American Meteorological Society (AMS).  

The AMS have received 280 reports so far of the fireball shooting over Connecticut and New York.

They also recorded sightings from Massachusetts, Delaware, Maryland, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Vermont, West Virginia and Québec in Canada. 

The National Weather Service in Mount Holly, New Jersey, also received several reports. One of their meteorologists also noticed the bright light, reporting a ‘bright, low flying meteor’. 

The fireball was most likely a common meteor, according to AMS.

Witnessing a bright fireball is a rare event – the vast majority of these meteors occur over oceans and uninhabited regions. 

Those fireballs that happen at night also stand a small chance of being detected because few people are out to notice them.

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