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Toyota defends donating $55,000 to 37 Republicans who voted against certifying election result

Japanese car manufacturer Toyota has defended its decision to donate $55,000 to 37 Republicans who voted against certifying the 2020 Presidential election result. 

Toyota donated more than any other corporate PAC to the politicians who voted against the result – and even gave more than twice as much as the second-biggest donor Cubic Corp.

It comes after the Toyota, alongside other corporations across the US, had said they would ‘assess’ their political donations in response to the Capitol Hill attacks on June 6 and growing divisiveness over the election results. 

But data from watchdog group Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington  and acquired by Axios paints a different picture. 

Toyota donated more than any other corporate PAC to the politicians who voted against the result – and even gave more than twice as much as the second-biggest donor Cubic Corp

The data shows that at least 103 of the 147 members who voted against the election result received donations from corporations including Walmart and Koch Industries.

But Toyota is the company who has donated far more than other businesses, with its $55,000 worth of donations being more than double than the second-biggest donor Cubic Corp.  

Just a month after the Capitol Hill attack, Toyota donated $1,000 to Republican Congressman and hardline Trump supporter Andy Biggs, according to official filings to the Federal Election Commission

Mr Biggs was one of Congress’ most vocal election conspiracy theorists and came under fire after going forward with voting against the election results even after the violent Capitol riot forced him to evacuate the chamber and delayed proceedings for hours.

The Arizona Rep. was also involved in the ‘Stop the Steal’ rally ahead of the storming of the Capitol.  

Toyota donated $1,000 to Republican Congressman and hardline Trump supporter Andy Biggs (pictured), according to official filings to the Federal Election Commission

Toyota donated $1,000 to Republican Congressman and hardline Trump supporter Andy Biggs (pictured), according to official filings to the Federal Election Commission

Rep. Luetkemeyer of Missouri has previously told donors that if corporations were going to put him in an enemies list for voting against the results, he would put them on his own, reports Bloomberg

Rep. Luetkemeyer of Missouri has previously told donors that if corporations were going to put him in an enemies list for voting against the results, he would put them on his own, reports Bloomberg

In March this year, Toyota also donated $1,000 to Republican Rep. Blaine Luetkemeyer and Rep. Alex Mooney, both of whom voted against certifying the election result. 

Rep. Luetkemeyer of Missouri has previously told donors that if corporations were going to put him in an enemies list for voting against the results, he would put them on his own, reports Bloomberg

The data shows that Toyota gave $55,000 to 37 Republicans who voted against the election results, which equates to a quarter of the group who objected to the President Biden’s win. Meanwhile, just 8 donations were given by Cubic Corp.

‘We do not believe it is appropriate to judge members of Congress solely based on their votes on the electoral certification,’ a Toyota spokesperson told Axios in a statement. 

‘Based on our thorough review, we decided against giving to some members who, through their statements and actions, undermine the legitimacy of our elections and institutions.’

The spokesperson did not respond to the news site’s questions about what counts as a statement which would be deemed to have undermined the election’s legitimacy.  

It comes after the Toyota, alongside other corporations across the US, had said they would 'assess' their political donations in response to the Capitol Hill attacks on June 6 and growing divisiveness over the election results

It comes after the Toyota, alongside other corporations across the US, had said they would ‘assess’ their political donations in response to the Capitol Hill attacks on June 6 and growing divisiveness over the election results 

Other companies who have said they would boycott their political donations in response to the Capitol Hill attacks have continued to give a total of $2.6 million to those who voted to object the result. 

For instance, Cigna donated $30,000 to the National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) and the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) despite announcing a boycott.  

PACs tied to at least six companies or industry groups—including AT&T, Pfizer, Jetblue, and the National Association of Realtors—have started giving again, forsaking commitments they made after January 6, according to CREW. 

‘By continuing to fund members of Congress who would undermine American democracy, these corporations and industry groups are sacrificing democratic government for access and influence,’ CREW said.  

In response to Toyota defending its decision to continue with their political donations, social media users have called for their boycott. 

One user tweeted: ‘Toyota, my husband and I have been driving your vehicles for nearly 20 years. Your response to Axios shows us a side that warrants us having to rethink continued vehicle ownership under your brand. #GoodbyeToyota.’

Another tweeted: ‘This response is arguably even more disturbing than the initial donations, Toyota. Just a terrible, terrible look.’

One tweeted: ‘I’m in the market to buy a new car, and [email protected] was at the top of my list, but definitely not anymore. Wow. Shameful.’ Another tweeted: ‘I’m saddened that Toyota supports the election deniers, as I like their cars. Crossing Toyota off my list when I buy my next car.’           

THE REPUBLICANS SO LOYAL TO TRUMP THEY VOTED TO OVERTURN THE ELECTION – AFTER HIS MOB SMASHED UP THE CAPITOL

SENATORS  

Ted Cruz – Texas 

Josh Hawley – Missouri 

Cindy Hyde-Smith – Mississippi 

John Kennedy – Louisiana   

Cynthia Lummis – Wyoming 

Roger Marshall – Kansas 

Rick Scott – Florida 

Tommy Tuberville – Alabama 

HOUSE  

 Robert B. Aderholt – Alabama

Rick Allen – Georgia 

Jodey Arrington – Texas 

Brian Babin – Texas 

Jim Baird – Indiana 

Jim Banks – Indiana 

Jack Bergman – Michigan 

Cliff Bentz – Oregon 

Stephanie Bice – Oklahoma 

Andy Biggs – Arizona 

Dan Bishop – North Carolina 

Lauren Boebert – Colorado  

Mike Bost – Illinois 

Ted Budd – North Carolina 

Michael C. Burgess – Texas 

Mo Brooks – Alabama

Tim Burchett – Tennessee 

Ken Calvert – California

Kat Cammack – Florida 

Jerry Carl – Alabama

Earl L. ‘Buddy’ Carter – Georgia 

John R. Carter – Texas 

Madison Cawthorn – North Carolina        

Steve Chabot – Ohio 

Ben Cline – Virginia 

Michael Cloud – Texas

 Andrew Clyde – Georgia 

Tom Cole – Oklahoma 

Rick Crawford – Arkansas 

Warren Davidson – Ohio 

Scott DesJarlais – Tennessee

Mario Diaz-Balart – Florida 

Byron Donalds – Florida

Jeff Duncan – South Carolina 

Neal Dunn – Florida  

Ron Estes – Kansas 

Pat Fallon – Texas 

Michelle Fischbach – Minnesota 

Scott Fitzgerald – Wisconsin 

Chuck Fleischmann – Tennessee  

Virginia Foxx – North Carolina 

Russ Fulcher – Idaho  

Scott Franklin – Florida  

Matt Gaetz – Florida 

Mike Garcia – California 

Bob Gibbs – Ohio 

Carlos Gimenez – Florida 

Louie Gohmert – Texas 

Bob Good – Virginia 

Lance Gooden – Texas 

Paul Gosar – Arizona 

Garret Graves – Louisiana 

Sam Graves – Missouri 

Marjorie Taylor Greene – Georgia 

Mark E. Green – Tennessee 

Morgan Griffith – Virginia 

Michael Guest – Mississippi 

Jim Hagedorn – Minnesota 

Andy Harris – Maryland 

Diana Harshbarger – Tennessee 

Vicky Hartzler – Missouri  

Kevin Hern – Oklahoma 

Jody Hice – Georgia 

Clay Higgins – Louisiana 

Yvette Herrell – New Mexico 

Richard Hudson – North Carolina 

Darrell Issa – California   

Chris Jacobs – New York 

Ronny Jackson – Texas 

Bill Johnson – Ohio 

Mike Johnson – Louisiana   

Jim Jordan – Ohio

John Joyce – Pennsylvania

Fred Keller – Pennsylvania 

Mike Kelly – Pennsylvania

Trent Kelly – Mississippi 

David Kustoff – Tennessee 

Doug LaMalfa – California

Brian Mast – Florida

Doug Lamborn – Colorado 

Jacob LaTurner – Kansas 

Debbie Lesko – Arizona 

 Billy Long – Missouri 

Barry Loudermilk – Georgia 

Frank Lucas – Oklahoma 

Blaine Luetkemeyer – Missouri 

Nicole Malliotakis – New York 

 Tracey Mann – Kansas   

Kevin McCarthy – California 

Lisa McClain – Michigan 

Daniel Meuser – Pennsylvania 

Carol Miller – West Virginia 

Mary Miller – Illinois  

Alexander Mooney – West Virginia 

Barry Moore – Alabama 

Markwayne Mullin – Oklahoma 

Gregory Murphy – North Carolina 

Troy Nehls – Texas 

Ralph Norman – South Carolina 

Devin Nunes – California 

Jay Obernolte – California 

Burgess Owens – Utah 

Steven Palazzo – Mississippi 

Gary Palmer – Alabama

Greg Pence – Indiana 

Scott Perry – Pennsylvania 

August Pfluger – Texas 

Bill Posey – Florida 

Guy Reschenthaler – Pennsylvania 

Tom Rice – South Carolina 

Harold Rogers – Kentucky 

Mike Rogers – Alabama 

John Rose – Tennessee 

Matt Rosendale – Montana

David Rouzer – North Carolina

John Rutherford – Florida

Steve Scalise – Louisiana 

David Schweikert – Arizona 

Pete Sessions – Texas 

Adrian Smith – Nebraska 

Jason Smith – Missouri 

Lloyd Smucker – Pennsylvania 

Elise Stefanik – New York 

Greg Steube – Florida

Chris Stewart – Utah 

Glenn Thompson – Pennsylvania 

Tom Tiffany – Wisconsin 

William Timmons – South Carolina 

Jeff Van Drew – New Jersey 

Beth Van Duyne – Texas 

Tim Walberg – Michigan  

Jackie Walorski – Indiana 

Randy Weber – Texas 

Daniel Webster – Florida 

Roger Williams – Texas

Joe Wilson – South Carolina 

Robert Wittman – Virginia 

Ron Wright – Texas 

Lee Zeldin – New York  

 

 


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